Dating Pewter Spoons?

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TerraBritannia
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I wondered if anyone might be good with dating Pewter spoons?

I think that they're often Post Medieval, but I believe that some older one's crop up from time to time too? I found this one recently in the edge of a ridge and furrow field, I also found 4 Musket balls not that far away.

This one has quite a long Rat's Tail on the underside, does that make it any easier to more accurately date? 1600's, 1700's or perhaps later?

I apologise for not having taken a photo with a scale yet, but I will do if needed. (I've only just remembered to ask about it). :thumbsup:

pewter spoon.jpg
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Marley

I think post med is a good enough era matey :thumbsup:
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Oxgirl
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I would estimate first half of the 18th century.

Here’s why - pewter went out of fashion in the 19th century. Pre 1700 the rat tail didn’t exist/ was very small. Handles were flatter than this one post 1750. So that narrows it down to first half of the 18th century in my opinion.

This article (extract below) is worth a read on dating pewter - it’s from The Pewter Society
Spoons and forks
Spoons were made from the necessity of living, and invented earlier than forks. In the 15th Century spoons had various knops, acorns, diamond points or lozenge points, saints, hexangonal knops, lions, seal tops and strawberry tops . These were all easy to produce by casting in a stone or bronze mould.

By the 17th Century simpler styles had evolved. The fancy knops had disappeared and spoons had just a plain slipped top , the end sliced off at an angle. In the 18th Century spoons began to look more like they do today with the ends flattened, a rat's tail on the bowl to strengthen it and a longer shaft. Some of the flattened ends appeared with portraits of the monarch or looked like a dog's nose.

Early forks had only 2 prongs but pewter was too soft to use so early forks were made of latten, a brass alloy, by pewterers. Later the more familiar 3 and 4 prong forks appeared but that was only in the 19th century. To add strength to them steel wires were placed in the middle of the fork and the pewter cast round them.

With the industrial revolution in the middle of the 19th Century mass produced cutlery produced in Sheffield spelt the end of pewter spoons and forks. Spoons and forks
Spoons were made from the necessity of living, and invented earlier than forks. In the 15th Century spoons had various knops, acorns, diamond points or lozenge points, saints, hexangonal knops, lions, seal tops and strawberry tops . These were all easy to produce by casting in a stone or bronze mould.

By the 17th Century simpler styles had evolved. The fancy knops had disappeared and spoons had just a plain slipped top , the end sliced off at an angle. In the 18th Century spoons began to look more like they do today with the ends flattened, a rat's tail on the bowl to strengthen it and a longer shaft. Some of the flattened ends appeared with portraits of the monarch or looked like a dog's nose.

Early forks had only 2 prongs but pewter was too soft to use so early forks were made of latten, a brass alloy, by pewterers. Later the more familiar 3 and 4 prong forks appeared but that was only in the 19th century. To add strength to them steel wires were placed in the middle of the fork and the pewter cast round them.

With the industrial revolution in the middle of the 19th Century mass produced cutlery produced in Sheffield spelt the end of pewter spoons and forks.
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TerraBritannia
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Thanks very much Marley and Cath. :thumbsup:

Thanks for the link and the detailed info. :)
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