Bottle digging Snobs

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Kenleyboy
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My digging buddy had been out of sorts for a while nursing two broken ribs so no digging for him , however it was time for a gentle return to the pleasures of digging albeit in a not so grand scale . We had not been back to our deep dig permission for sometime and for safety reasons it isn't somewhere that would be sensible to dig alone . The excellent pond dig is now impossible to return to until the summer as it is now full of water and I don't fancy sloshing around in the wet and mud this time of year .The other tips require some sweat and toil and to be honest my old mate just isn't up for it until fully healed .
All was not lost though , my local shallow tip was just the answer and despite it being a rather a late tip in general , they can throw up a few earlier bottles etc so always worth a dig about and it is literally a foot or so down so nice and easy for my mate to contend with so it was decided we would have a few hours out in the fresh air .
My last trip was my " Art Deco" session and although not quite my thing , my friend who asked me to bring some back was more than pleased with his booty and wanted a few more if I ever decided to go back and have a dig about . It seemed a good idea then to tie the two ends together , get my mate back digging and bring back some more requested gifts .
These late tips never really get the attention they should , they are deemed too late and quite a few bottle diggers get a bit sniffy with anything other than Victoriana or earlier , bottles beyond this period turns many a noses up which in my opinion is very short sighted . I have to agree that I much prefer the older tips just like anyone else but even Codd bottles , Flagons and stoneware Ginger beers ran well after the Victorian era and early stuff does turn up in later period tips , or late chuckouts as they are termed .
Bottle diggers in the 1970s were digging Victorian bottles that were barely 70 odd years old compared to now which run well over a century plus making them ever more desirable items to those interested . Bottles from the 1940s being dug now are in a similar age bracket by comparing those diggers from the 70s yet today they are in some sectors frowned upon as common old rubbish even as far as bottles from the 1920s yet they are a 100 years old . Perhaps tomorrows bottle diggers will see things in a different light and to be honest they won't have much choice as more and more Victorian tips are built upon and lost forever and access is even more difficult to obtain these days .
Part fo the fun for me is being out in the sticks , I love it and even the gentle stroll along the old rail line is a pleasant one . The morning air was fresh with a grey overcast sky and the previous nights rain had left the grassy banks wet and slippery so we had to watch where we trod to avoid a slippery journey down the muddy embankments . We dodged around and through the draping slo berry bushes which when brushed against shook the branches and sprayed us with droplets of rain water , not a nice feeling on such a fresh cold morning but we persevered .
We pass these little fellas along the way , they make a hell of a racket when disturbed and quite a crowd of them strutting their stuff with each one trying to be "cock of the estate " , funny old creatures !
short dig cockerals.jpg
Finally we pass the reed beds to our right and beyond is a forest of trees looking rather splendid in their autumn shades and once past this splendour the tip is a mere 100 yards away banking off to the left and spreading itself in amongst the cover of trees neatly tucked away from prying eyes . With this place it is literally a case of throwing your spade up in the air and where it lands , just dig , its that rammed with bottles as my mate was soon to find out . I had warned him prior to our trip to not except too much in the favourable sense of digging any thing special but he will find bottles and plenty of them , mostly food jars , sauce and pickle bottle galore yet in amongst the common enough domestic trash there is always a feint whisper of something nice in amongst the rubble of glass .
For the next couple of hours we dug and toiled with the endless amount of bottles which were so compact it was hard to get the blade of a spade in the ground and when time permitted we chatted , drank tea and joked about , just a bit of harmless fun on a Sunday morning .
My buddy did well and found a ginger beer bottle circa. 1905 so it just goes to show what can turn up in these later tips and also confirmed there was hope yet of finding something older in amongst the common rubbish .
short dig bottles.jpg
The best find for me was the blue poison bottle , clean as a whistle and once cleaned looked as if it had been made yesterday , thats the beauty of these tips , the glass is in such great condition and not sick or burned and melted . I did find a couple of the Art Deco bottles , these two were different from the last batch so were worth taking back to my mate to join his other batch , still intact with the original lids .The little Stephens ink bottle looks mint , even the lid hasn't dulled with age , as if its just come off the production line but has the potential to be 80 years old .
short dig art deco bottles.jpg
short dig blue poison.jpg
Marley

Good read :thumbsup:
They arnt my thing, but can understand the interest for those that do get it .
Dave The Slave
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Great write up as per usual, Paul.
As you said the 30/40`s stuff could be the collectable of the future.
Great to have some bottles complete with lids and the ink bottle is in amazing condition.
Really enjoyed reading your day out and felt like i was there.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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Oxgirl
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I think I’d be one of those sniffy ones as I don’t like later things but that would make me the fool. What with a nice shallow tip and less digging, and those very very nice finds anyone would be an idiot not to dig there. That ink bottle is an absolute beauty :Star:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Susie F
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As always, such a pleasure to read XX
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Mucky
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Great post yet again.. I have one of those small blue poison bottles.
What makes them a good find if you don't mind my asking?
Glad you could get your mate out! :thumbsup:
The detail in your posts is brilliant to read.. You should write about it and get published! :thumbsup:
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Kenleyboy
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Mucky wrote: Sun Oct 25, 2020 6:55 pm Great post yet again.. I have one of those small blue poison bottles.
What makes them a good find if you don't mind my asking?
Glad you could get your mate out! :thumbsup:
The detail in your posts is brilliant to read.. You should write about it and get published! :thumbsup:
blue poisons are a favourite amongst bottle diggers I think purely for the fact of the colour of the glass . Even the common ones are always appreciated due to the rich deep blue .
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Emily
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I don’t have any, but I love poison bottles!! I think they’re great!! Would you let me borrow it so I can make a mould from it?? ☺️☺️

There’s an amazing and HUGE ancient bottle dump just near me that a friend of mine owns, but I can’t get on it because a natural wildflower meadow has inconveniently parked itself right on top and it’s protected. 😤

Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE wildflower meadows, but there are more convenient places for them to go. Haha.
Live long and prospect
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Kenleyboy
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Emily wrote: Mon Oct 26, 2020 12:44 pm I don’t have any, but I love poison bottles!! I think they’re great!! Would you let me borrow it so I can make a mould from it?? ☺️☺️

There’s an amazing and HUGE ancient bottle dump just near me that a friend of mine owns, but I can’t get on it because a natural wildflower meadow has inconveniently parked itself right on top and it’s protected. 😤

Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE wildflower meadows, but there are more convenient places for them to go. Haha.
I have just sent you a pm . :thumbsup:
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