A few bits of pottery from yesterday.

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alloverover
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Had an hour on a predominantly Romano British site yesterday, again more pot than metal, so I thought I would post a couple of bits up, if our new pottery team would like to say something about them that would be great.
Mainly grey and red wares, a couple of samian looking sherds but the two most interesting bits, to me, are the grey ware piece with the decoration and the course piece, red on the inside curve and much darker outside.
Found in North Essex/ South Cambs area, any thoughts most welcome,
Cheers,
aoo :thumbsup:
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Dave The Slave
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Nice pottery bits.
Like the triangular design on the piece to the left of Samian.
Looking forward to the info from our new pottery experts.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
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figgis
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alloverover wrote: Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:37 am the course piece, red on the inside curve and much darker outside.
I'd be interested to find out what that is too, having just turned up a couple of very similar sherds :thumbsup:
Pottery Man
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The interesting Hobnob piece is smoke-reduced to grey outside where it settled and buried itself into the ashes while the bonfire settled with the open mouth of the pot able to oxidise as it received plenty of very hot air. The white grits look like crushed limestone. As a rough and open grained pot, it ought to have been suited to dry storage of foods rather than a close-grain finish for cooking.
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Looking through the magnified photos I am more inclined to say that the clay has crushed shell and crushed flint rather than limestone. Those two materials are found combined in alluvial deposits where both are left by meandering slower-moving rivers and you may need to go looking locally.
Your nearest local achaeologists (not always poor old Paul Blinkhorn) are more expert at local Iron Age coarsewares and their early post-Roman offspring.
I'm not a Roman pottery expert but I saw a very similar patterned greyware group recently and they were talking of late 3rd and mid 4th AD. Grey coarseware was made throughout the occupation and really it is just shapes and decoration fashions matched to dates.
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alloverover
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Pottery Man wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 12:22 am The interesting Hobnob piece is smoke-reduced to grey outside where it settled and buried itself into the ashes while the bonfire settled with the open mouth of the pot able to oxidise as it received plenty of very hot air. The white grits look like crushed limestone. As a rough and open grained pot, it ought to have been suited to dry storage of foods rather than a close-grain finish for cooking.
Pottery Man wrote: Thu Oct 22, 2020 12:40 am Looking through the magnified photos I am more inclined to say that the clay has crushed shell and crushed flint rather than limestone. Those two materials are found combined in alluvial deposits where both are left by meandering slower-moving rivers and you may need to go looking locally.
Your nearest local achaeologists (not always poor old Paul Blinkhorn) are more expert at local Iron Age coarsewares and their early post-Roman offspring.
I'm not a Roman pottery expert but I saw a very similar patterned greyware group recently and they were talking of late 3rd and mid 4th AD. Grey coarseware was made throughout the occupation and really it is just shapes and decoration fashions matched to dates.
Thanks for your thoughts Pottery Man :thumbsup:
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