Surprise find on past finds

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Saki
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Looking through and sorting finds. And this little buckle that i just classed as a lovely little medieval buckle. Then spotted what I had always just thought was a narrowed "worn down" part of the buckle. Turns out its a join. So this then has not been cast, unless its a repair. Also, and it took my quite sone time to photograph it with different lights, the little Celtic Knot design. Surprise no.1

Surprise no.2 was my little ring. Basic little copper or bronze ring. Possibly a poor wedding ring. But only noticed that it has "marks" on inside. Now this may be a "lucky bag" or fairground ring. But found on a ridge and furrow field (of medieval possibly oxen made with how wide they are) in the middle of nowhere (the back of beyond).
Was the inside marks pretend hallmarks? Was this ring golden and shiny and had "hallmarks" for the vulnerable illiterate?
Kinda nice to get surprise finds on past finds
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Easylife
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A nice interesting old buckle there. :thumbsup:
I don't think the ring is very old though, probably makers and plated marks.
D2 - 13"x11" coil - audio only.
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Saki
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Easylife wrote: Sun Nov 22, 2020 10:15 pm A nice interesting old buckle there. :thumbsup:
I don't think the ring is very old though, probably makers and plated marks.
Thanks Easylife. The buckle was found about Sept. And was about 14 or so inches down and about 10 feet from a Hammered Eddie Penny
I'd say your right about the ring. Not marks at all,just blank squares. Been at it since with a toothpick. Nothing.
If my theory was right about illiterate customers, it kinda is very sad.
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Doug
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General consensus for the base metal ring with hallmarks is a Paupers Ring, possible to find them still with some traces of gilding on them.

Intensionally or otherwise made to deceive the buyer/recipient.
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Saffron
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"Back in the day" that would have been a lovely buckle with the little celtic knot.

Regarding the comment about the ring "found on a ridge and furrow field (of medieval possibly oxen made with how wide they are)" If the ridge and furrow is medieval it almost certainly would have been oxen, in those days only the "rich" would have had horses.

The following extract is taken from https://www.heavyhorses.org.uk/working/ploughing/

Ploughing is the skill of cultivating land for the growing of crops. Early ploughs were forked sticks or stag’s antlers which scratched the surface of the soil, but by Roman times animal power was being used to pull shaped pieces of wood to turn the soil. By the time of William the Conqueror the basic parts of the plough had evolved – a coulter to cut a vertical slice through the soil, a share to undercut the slice horizontally, and a mould-board to turn the slice over and bury any vegetation. In the 11th century wheels were developed to regulate the depth of the furrow.

Medieval ploughs were very heavy and pulled by teams of oxen, controlled by whip or pole. The oxen ploughed steadily and did a good job. Farms were small and the land would have been ploughed more often than today to control weeds.

In the 18th century – a time of much agricultural progress – a lightweight plough was produced which could be pulled by a pair of horses, which was faster than oxen.


Evan
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