Buried war badges with gun photos.

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Emily
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Easylife wrote: Tue Dec 22, 2020 2:33 am Well to be quite fair, Bors figured that it was a pencil sharpener, so yes, 80% credit due there. I was late to the game so just googled 'antique pistol pencil sharpener', looked at images and the exact match was very soon before my eyes - I'm not really that knowledgeable about pistol shaped pencil sharpeners! :rollinglaughing:
But still second position ain't too bad Pete, though must try harder in future! :lol: :thumbsup:
Joking aside though, it's just a case of selecting the right search terms to get the right result, but that's often much easier said than done! :thumbsup:
Your help was also greatly appreciated. Couldn’t have been found without you. 🥰
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Emily
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Saffron wrote: Tue Dec 22, 2020 2:56 am Emily an interesting collection of badges, and it looks like a child took the families badges out to play and sadly either buried them or just lost them.

To answer your one question especially during WWI men frequently changed units. Two of the more common reasons were -
1) When a unit lost a lot of men and had to get a lot of replacements from other units.
2) After a wounded man recoverd from his injuries on his return he was sent to another unit.

However, remember that at that time families were a lot larger, so 4 sons or more from one family serving was not uncommon. In the early days of the war men from the same area (and hence families) were often grouped into the same "pals units", but when these units suffered heavy casualties it was devasting to the area, and could mean several men from the same family being killed, so this practice was discontinued to avoid this - so if it was 4 brothers the fact that they were all in different units is not surprising.

However the RAOC and RASC badges are interesting as they are both prefixed "R" (Royal). As the Army Service Corps only gained that prefix in late 1918 (I am not 100% but I believe after the armistice on 11 November), while the Army Ordnance Corps gained it even later in 1922.

If you PM me the address where these were found I will look in the census and see if I can then locate men from that household in the army records, (I have access to Ancestry, The Genealogist, and Forces War records so might get a hit with a bit of luck).

Evan
Hi Evan, that’s all really interesting. Thank you for taking the time to tell me. ☺️ I shall PM you the address. I tried to have a look myself, but don’t have access to the right records. It’d be amazing if a person/s could be found. I’ll get them framed up to give the the house owner with the information, but also realise that there’s a chance that the badges could’ve come from anywhere and might not be related to the property or people who lived there at all. We find enough random stuff in strange locations for me to be a little sceptical. 🤷‍♀️
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Saffron
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Emily wrote: Tue Dec 22, 2020 9:00 am

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Hi Evan, that’s all really interesting. Thank you for taking the time to tell me. ☺️ I shall PM you the address. I tried to have a look myself, but don’t have access to the right records. It’d be amazing if a person/s could be found. I’ll get them framed up to give the the house owner with the information, but also realise that there’s a chance that the badges could’ve come from anywhere and might not be related to the property or people who lived there at all. We find enough random stuff in strange locations for me to be a little sceptical. 🤷‍♀️
Emily,
I am 110% with you about the "We find enough random stuff in strange locations for me to be a little sceptical."

Everybody knows me and my interest in WWI so as I have access to the family history sites I like to help where I can.

I have things to do before Christmas (like finish the cards, and start shopping ..... well Santa never delivers his presents until late on Christmas Eve and I follow his example :lol: :lol: ). But will have a look when things are quieter.

Evan
Dave The Slave
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Never would have got the pencil sharpener ID, Emily.
Went down the toy pistol route.1950`s no, 60`s no 1970`s no.( I`m tempted, very tempted) sorry nearly went into Lurcio mode. ;)
Have seen cigarette lighters in the same form.
Glad that has been resolved.
You`re too young top know this but this will bring back memories for those of us at school in the 60`s and 70`s.
In Primary school, the class teacher had a large pencil sharpener on their desk and you would go up and wind the handle to sharpen your pencil.
Some even tried to get the smallest pencil , sharpening away until their finger was in danger of getting minced. :o
No H & S back then.
Will be interesting to see what Evan unearths on your unearthments.
To be continued...........
Cheers, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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Oxgirl
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It’s fun properly researching finds isn’t it?

Well done everyone - especially Bors who set the right path.

Glad my child’s hoard theory now holds water too. I like that idea :Party:
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Bors
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Yes your right , I`d say some kids have this quirkiness about them that they feel they have to bury certain items for one reason or another . This little lot could well have been buried with the intention to at some point go back and retrieve them one day , but again for reasons we`ll never know why , they didn`t get retrieved. Its a theory that is as valid as anything else but at least they were retrieved one day in the future, for others to only wonder what did actually happen for them to never see the light of day till the day Emily was rooting around in her neighbors garden :lol:
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Emily
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Bors wrote: Wed Dec 23, 2020 9:26 am Yes your right , I`d say some kids have this quirkiness about them that they feel they have to bury certain items for one reason or another . This little lot could well have been buried with the intention to at some point go back and retrieve them one day , but again for reasons we`ll never know why , they didn`t get retrieved. Its a theory that is as valid as anything else but at least they were retrieved one day in the future, for others to only wonder what did actually happen for them to never see the light of day till the day Emily was rooting around in her neighbors garden :lol:
The kicker is that there could be more, but they had their driveway put in only inches away!! I’m happy that these at least survived.
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Emily
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Oxgirl wrote: Tue Dec 22, 2020 11:59 pm It’s fun properly researching finds isn’t it?

Well done everyone - especially Bors who set the right path.

Glad my child’s hoard theory now holds water too. I like that idea :Party:
I like the idea of them being buried by a child, but I don’t know why I prefer the idea of a soldier burying them better. Maybe it’s because a child was most likely playing with them and either lost them or buried them and forgot, yet, with a soldier, they could have been having a crisis of identity, so burying them was a sign of a fresh start. 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️
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