couple of fossils found today

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Kenleyboy
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Another ground scanning dog walk today and with the amount of rain we have had this past few days it has washed away the top soil revealing more interesting goodies on the fields .
This one jumped out at me in amongst the flint strewn soil most notably the white nodule . I am no expert but it has the hallmarks of a fossilised creature .
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This next one is also interesting and I found this on my way back out of the field towards home . The amount of times I have stepped over this and never noticed . The dogs were busy sniffing the ground so I stood idle for a while , looked down and it was almost at my feet . This has come out of the farm drainage ditch as they have recently been cleared of any debris to prevent flooding and there are a number of these lumps of rock in the spoil . Light was fading but its worth another root through them in case of anymore .
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DaveP
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Paul,
I'd go for a sponge on the top one and maybe ammonite on the lower.
I can get them ID'd but need a scale or idea of the size please. If you think some detectorists get uppity about missing scales you should try some fossil folk :lol:

Chris
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Kenleyboy
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DaveP wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 5:59 pm Paul,
I'd go for a sponge on the top one and maybe ammonite on the lower.
I can get them ID'd but need a scale or idea of the size please. If you think some detectorists get uppity about missing scales you should try some fossil folk :lol:

Chris
:lol:

Sponge is 45 mm x 35 mm

Ammonite is 35 mm x 35 mm

Thanks Chris :thumbsup:
Blackadder43
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*Dumb question alert*
With these fossils being found on land in todays times, when you look around and say to yourself "i wonder how deep it was here?"
So dumb question of the day is:
Is there any way to estimate how deep it may have been when these creatures were actively playing and growing?

I suspect i am missing something very simple here, but i have to ask :D
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DaveP
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Blackadder43 wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 6:35 pm *Dumb question alert*
With these fossils being found on land in todays times, when you look around and say to yourself "i wonder how deep it was here?"
So dumb question of the day is:
Is there any way to estimate how deep it may have been when these creatures were actively playing and growing?

I suspect i am missing something very simple here, but i have to ask :D
When the ice sheets came down they scoured everywhere including the existing land surface. Then when they receded they left all the rubbish behind so you get fossils out of place. As for the depth of the sea, my guess is they were mostly within the region that light can penetrate.
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DaveP
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Sponge is 45 mm x 35 mm

Ammonite is 35 mm x 35 mm

[/quote]

First one - sponge - Siphonia

second - also a sponge - probably radially ribbed top of a funnel shaped Ventriculites

so say the fossils folks :thumbsup:
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Kenleyboy
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DaveP wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 8:51 pm Sponge is 45 mm x 35 mm

Ammonite is 35 mm x 35 mm
First one - sponge - Siphonia

second - also a sponge - probably radially ribbed top of a funnel shaped Ventriculites

so say the fossils folks :thumbsup:
[/quote]

Many thanks for the information , I seem to be gathering quite a collection on my dog walks . It is an odd one as I have always been looking for them without much luck , yet this past year they are suddenly appearing on a semi regular basis . I will check the rest of the spoil from the ditches , could be a few more in amongst the rubble . :thumbsup:
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Oxgirl
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I need to start fossil hunting again too. Yours are lovely and it’s a great way to pass the time collecting history without our trusty machines. Just need to water in the fields to recede now and I might get the chance to see some as they seem to be exposed after a good flood. And this year it’s been a pretty epic flood!

Keep looking and sharing Paul please. I’m loving the fossil education!
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Easylife
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The fossils are an added bonus. I mainly search pasture but in one cultivated field there were quite a lot of devil's toe nails, so a first fossil find for me. It still seems kind of surreal that this land was once underwater!
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HolzHammer
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Kenleyboy wrote: Mon Feb 01, 2021 10:26 pm First one - sponge - Siphonia

second - also a sponge - probably radially ribbed top of a funnel shaped Ventriculites

so say the fossils folks :thumbsup:
Many thanks for the information , I seem to be gathering quite a collection on my dog walks . It is an odd one as I have always been looking for them without much luck , yet this past year they are suddenly appearing on a semi regular basis . I will check the rest of the spoil from the ditches , could be a few more in amongst the rubble . :thumbsup:
[/quote]

I think you are probably getting your eye in! Hope all well
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DaveP
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Easylife wrote: Tue Feb 02, 2021 12:50 am It still seems kind of surreal that this land was once underwater!
It's always amazing to look up. When you're next on the coast near a fossil rich, sedimentary rock, cliff (Dorset, Yorkshire etc.) the top was under water at some point (unless the ground has been pushed up over time). We live under the North Downs with chalk outcrops near the tops - the water would have been very deep where we are and I've found echinoid traces in flints in the garden - unfortunately the fossils around here aren't very good.

Then there's the reverse - Doggerland was once dry and settled and that wasn't very long ago.

All amazing stuff.
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