Cover Crops and detecting?

Post Reply
User avatar
TerraBritannia
Posts: 542
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2020 7:01 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Has thanked: 917 times
Been thanked: 462 times
Contact:

Last year on one permission, the farmer mentioned that one of his fields was going have a cover crop on it, while most of the other fields would be seeded. It's only just recently occurred to me, that I should look up cover crops and see what they actually are.

As far as I can tell, cover crops are planted to benefit the soil and not there as a crop to harvest? Is that likely to mean that farmers are more likely to let us wander over cover crops with out machines?
TerraBritannia [previously known as TerraEnglandia] but Andy is my real name.
https://www.youtube.com/TerraBritannia
Minelab Equinox 800
User avatar
Bors
Posts: 849
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2020 6:18 pm
Has thanked: 161 times
Been thanked: 516 times

Cover Crops are plants such likes as what we call up here Sheep Turnip and other types of brassica plants such as Rape seed and Kale. :thumbsup:
Things aint cooking in my kitchen
User avatar
Oxgirl
Posts: 13376
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2020 4:21 pm
Location: Oxfordshire
Has thanked: 10043 times
Been thanked: 11660 times

I thought they were cover for the pheasants :oops:

At least now I know as well :ugeek:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
User avatar
shaggybfc
Posts: 2659
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2020 8:46 pm
Location: Warwick
Has thanked: 2160 times
Been thanked: 2500 times

Most cover crops around here are for soil enrichment, to put nitrogen back into the soil after a few years of wheat crops. It gets ploughed back in or the sheep will munch through it. I'd find it hard to detect a field with a crop on it, far too tall to easily detect through.
Always carefully proof-read what you've typed to see if you've any words out.
Deus with 11" X35 and 9" HF coils. MI 6 pinpointer.
User avatar
DaveP
Posts: 1779
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:40 pm
Location: Spread in England
Has thanked: 663 times
Been thanked: 1947 times

Oxgirl wrote: Mon Feb 15, 2021 9:25 pm I thought they were cover for the pheasants :oops:

At least now I know as well :ugeek:
That's just a different form of "cover" and known as cover crop - ask Dave, he appreciates the tall cover :thumbsup:
jcmaloney
Posts: 292
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2020 4:29 pm
Has thanked: 278 times
Been thanked: 395 times

There are cover crops for shooting - normally a maze , millet, kale sort of mix for gamebirds.
Normally in blocks or field margins and attract a stewardship payment as they feed nature as well. Normally cut down/ploughed in late spring/early summer and can leave some detectable blocks. :thumbsup:

There are cover crops for drilling into - normally brassicas, mustard, sorghum and others. Used for moisture and nitrogen retention and drilled straight into, although they might get sprayed off first.

If your farmer is direct drilling then there won`t be much/any soil "rotation" in the detecting layer. Depending on the soil structure you might have wait 5 or 6 years for it to be ploughed or moled/flat lifted.

Here endeth the agronomy lesson. :D
I`m Marmite me. Opinionated, obstinate and somewhat tenacious.
User avatar
TerraBritannia
Posts: 542
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2020 7:01 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Has thanked: 917 times
Been thanked: 462 times
Contact:

jcmaloney wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 8:16 pm If your farmer is direct drilling then there won`t be much/any soil "rotation" in the detecting layer. Depending on the soil structure you might have wait 5 or 6 years for it to be ploughed or moled/flat lifted.

Here endeth the agronomy lesson. :D
That's interesting, I know that the farmer (actually it's his son these days) does direct drill. So there's still a possibility that the fields may eventually get ploughed?
TerraBritannia [previously known as TerraEnglandia] but Andy is my real name.
https://www.youtube.com/TerraBritannia
Minelab Equinox 800
User avatar
DaveP
Posts: 1779
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:40 pm
Location: Spread in England
Has thanked: 663 times
Been thanked: 1947 times

TerraEnglandia wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:54 pm
That's interesting, I know that the farmer (actually it's his son these days) does direct drill. So there's still a possibility that the fields may eventually get ploughed?
One farm where we pigeon shoot has direct drilled for 20 odd years. The ploughs went years ago. I think you'll just have to ask how they will manage the land.
On another farm they use subsoilers and power harrows every year. If you get on the land a few days after sub-soiling there are huge voids about 8" below the surface and I've always thought/wondered many finds will just drop further down.
jcmaloney
Posts: 292
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2020 4:29 pm
Has thanked: 278 times
Been thanked: 395 times

TerraEnglandia wrote: Tue Feb 16, 2021 9:54 pm That's interesting, I know that the farmer (actually it's his son these days) does direct drill. So there's still a possibility that the fields may eventually get ploughed?
Depends on the soil.
On the clay around these parts something has to be done about every 5 or 6 years , currently that is ploughing but I`m expecting it to go to sub-soiling next cycle, and the one after that most of it will be under houses. :cry:
I`m Marmite me. Opinionated, obstinate and somewhat tenacious.
Post Reply