Silver War Badge! REUNITED.

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Easylife
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Thanks again for your research Evan. I have a feeling that John may have moved again after the 1911 Census, on his return, more local to the find spot? :thumbsup:
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Saffron
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I have had another look for his WWI records and can not find any more information.

So we have the following.

Name: John Wm Kinton
Rank: Private
Regiment: Army Veterinary Corps
Regimental Number: 14366
Discharge Unit: Royal Army Veterinary Corps
Discharge Regiment: A.V.C.
Silver War Badge Number: 268725
Piece: 3238
List Number: RAVC 0001-0340
Record Group: WO
Record Class: 329

Enlisted: 12 Dec 1915
Discharge: 25 Oct 1917, aged 40.

He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal. So we know he served in a theatre of war, (although we have no information the Western Front is the most likely), where he was probably wounded as he was discharged and awarded the Silver War Badge.

Remember in WWI the bulk of supplies were moved by horses and mules, and the artillery guns were moved by horses, so the Army Veterinary Corps were vital, and a lot of the men in it would have been at the front - it was not a "nice cushy job" the rear areas.
Although horses and mules would be by far the largest part of the work of the AVC, a lot of messages were sent by carrier pigeons the care of which they would also be responsible.


His Pension Record card gave his year of birth and where he lived.

World War I Pension Ledgers and Index Cards, 1914-1923
Name: John William Kinton
Gender: Male
Rank: Private
Record Type: Disability
Birth Date: 1877
Residence Place: Hill Top Eastwood Notts.
Military Service Region: East Midlands, North Midlands
Military Country: England
Discharge Date: 25 Oct 1917
Service Number: 14366
Corps, Regiment or Unit: Army Veterinary Corps
Service Branch: Military (Army)
Title: WWI Pension Record Cards and Ledgers
Description: Pension Record Ledger


Evan
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Saffron
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Here he is in the 1911 census
Address: Raglan Street, Hill Top, Eastwood, Notts
Civil Parish: Greasley

Name, age, year born (as always with a census can be a year out), where born
John W Kinton, 33 1878 Male Head Leicester, Glenfield, Coal Miner "Lauer" (last word as transcribed, might it be loader??)
Elizabeth Kinton, 32 1879 Female Wife Eastwood, Nottingham
They had been married 14 years

Children
Name, age, year born, son / daughter, where born
Gladys A Kinton 13 1898 Daughter Leicester
Archie W Kinton 11 1900 Son Leicester, Loughborough
Eva Ethel Kinton 8 1903 Daughter Greasley, Nottinghamshire
Albert E Kinton 5 1906 Son Greasley, Nottinghamshire
John Stanley Kinton 3 1908 Son Greasley, Nottinghamshire
Gershom Kinton 5months 1910 Son Greasley, Nottinghamshire

This was the first year that the householder filled in the census form themselves so this was done by John Kinton himself.

A family tree on Ancestry gives these dates for the birth of the children, and subsequently Ernest in 1917.

Birth of Daughter Gladys Adelaide Kinton(1898–1965)
20 Sep 1898 • Leicestershire, United Kingdom

Birth of Son Archibald William Kinton(1900–1965)
1900 • Leicestershire, United Kingdom

Birth of Daughter Eva Ethel Kinton(1903–1957)
1903 • Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Birth of Son Albert Edwin Kinton(1906–1963)
3 May 1906 • Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Birth of Son John Stanley Kinton(1908–1963)
16 May 1908 • Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Birth of Son Gershom Kinton(1910–1986)
1910 • Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Birth of Son Ernest Kinton(1917–1969)
31 Jul 1917 • Basford Nottingham


Evan
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Saffron
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In 1901 the family lived in the Holy Trinity parish of Loughborough, Leicestershire, and John was working as a grocers porter.


John Kinton had married Elizabeth Jane Wagstaff in the April to June quarter of 1897, in the Leicester registration district.

Elizabeth was the daughter of James, a coal miner, and Mary A. Wagstaff, and was slightly younger than John having been born in the first quarter of 1879 in Eastwood.
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Easylife
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John W Kinton died in 1948 age 70 years old.
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Emily
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Some amazing research!! I was hoping I’d have a story to follow when I woke up. ☺️

And FYI, I did bring the popcorn, I just ate it while I was waiting.

Maybe that why no one has heard from Figgs again......I’m thinking he did the same as me. 😂
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Easylife
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Saffron wrote: Fri Mar 05, 2021 10:40 pm
He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal.
IMG_20210306_091910.jpg
:thumbsup:
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figgis
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Emily wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 9:07 am Some amazing research!! I was hoping I’d have a story to follow when I woke up. ☺️

And FYI, I did bring the popcorn, I just ate it while I was waiting.

Maybe that why no one has heard from Figgs again......I’m thinking he did the same as me. 😂
Substitute gin for popcorn and you'd be about right :lol:

As ever, some cracking research skills and if anyone can track down any descendants, Evan can :clapping:
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Great research from Evan , which should not be taken for granted, imagine a lot of time involved. :clapping:
Thinking about it, some of us on here are probably distantly related to each other.
Another unearthed detecting artifact that we know more about.
Prefer this type of find to the more common loose change that is found called, Hammered.
Co incidentally this is the second Silver War Service badge this week, that i never knew existed. The other being on Sunday`s Antiques Roadshow, March 1st, RAF badge with Eagles awarded to Americans before they entered the war officially in 1942, extremely rare.
" Last weekend, the Antiques Roadshow team were in Stonor Park, Oxfordshire and Mark Smith was on hand to discuss a badge from World War II. The expert, who is a military museum curator and a specialist in military medals was pleased to see “the rarest badge” from 1942, which was valued at an incredible £3,000."
Cheers all, thanks again Evan and also to Easylife obviously for finding the badge in the first place.. :thumbsup:
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Amazing bit of research that fleshes out the human side of the find...

I wonder how he felt about loosing the badge? Was it something he was proud of and valued, or a bitter reminder of a grim and dark period of his life?
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Easylife
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Pete E wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:26 pm Amazing bit of research that fleshes out the human side of the find...

I wonder how he felt about loosing the badge? Was it something he was proud of and valued, or a bitter reminder of a grim and dark period of his life?
Well I don't think a lost badge could be replaced. But would he have worn it when the war was over?
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Pete E
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Easylife wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:34 pm
Well I don't think a lost badge could be replaced. But would he have worn it when the war was over?
Good question...Another possibility is that he gifted it to his wife to wear as a sweetheart badge? I think that's fairly unlikely in this case, as the amount of other military finds make me think it was a camp or exercise area??? Maybe it was a temporary holding/convalescence facility of some sort for sick/injured troops?
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Easylife
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There are no buildings close by, just a field by a brook and footpath. I think I'll have another search there.
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Nice work Saffron. Seeing the time you posted replies,,,, you must be a little tired today.... :thumbsup:
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Saffron
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Dave The Slave wrote: Sat Mar 06, 2021 2:35 pm Great research from Evan , which should not be taken for granted, imagine a lot of time involved. :clapping:
Thinking about it, some of us on here are probably distantly related to each other.
Another unearthed detecting artifact that we know more about.
Prefer this type of find to the more common loose change that is found called, Hammered.
Co incidentally this is the second Silver War Service badge this week, that i never knew existed. The other being on Sunday`s Antiques Roadshow, March 1st, RAF badge with Eagles awarded to Americans before they entered the war officially in 1942, extremely rare.
" Last weekend, the Antiques Roadshow team were in Stonor Park, Oxfordshire and Mark Smith was on hand to discuss a badge from World War II. The expert, who is a military museum curator and a specialist in military medals was pleased to see “the rarest badge” from 1942, which was valued at an incredible £3,000."
Cheers all, thanks again Evan and also to Easylife obviously for finding the badge in the first place.. :thumbsup:
Dave.
Cheers Dave,
I can confirm it does take a lot of time, and experience to avoid some of the pitfalls as its easy to find you are following the wrong man / family!. Even with the full 3 names of John William Kinton there were two that earned the Silver War Badge and both had the Leicestershire connection. I dread to think how many hours the one the other day for John Warwick Sheriff took, and I sense a fair few more hours coming with this one.

I totally agree with your comment "Prefer this type of find to the more common loose change that is found called, Hammered." With a hammered all you can say is about what was happening at the time and general background but none of that connects it to the person that last it.

Evan
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