Roman for ID

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Saffron
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On the Anton Rally I managed to find a ROMAN that was better than your normal grot. Those that know me will know what an extremely rare event this is.

As I never find them I have no idea what it other than "Roman with 2 soldiers", (and even then would not be surprised if the "soldiers" were "gods"), so any ID would be much appreciated as always.

Evan
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Dave The Slave
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That`s a different reverse from the common two standards.
Nice find.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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alloverover
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VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP reverse and I reckon its Crispus going by what I can read of the obverse legend, this type was used on coins of various rulers :thumbsup:

Edit, London mint :thumbsup:
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Saffron
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alloverover wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 8:27 pm VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP reverse and I reckon its Crispus going by what I can read of the obverse legend, this type was used on coins of various rulers :thumbsup:

Edit, London mint :thumbsup:
Many thanks for that.

So my two "soldiers" were "Victories" :oops:


That "Edit" is very interesting. As I knew that most coins were minted in Rome initially then other cities in mainland Europe rather than London so did a quick google and found this on https://24carat.co.uk/frame.php?url=rom ... nmint.html


London Mint Roman Coins

In the early days of the Roman Empire, almost every coin in circulation in the Empire was struck in Rome and diffused throughout the Empire. However, during the crisis of the third century, the sheer volume of coins required during this hyperinflationary period meant that the Roman Mint could no longer cope alone. As a consequence, mints were set up in various cities around the Empire, each with their own mintmark to denote the origin of the coin (e.g. 'Ant' for Antioch).
However, in the case of the London mint, the reason it was set up was not due to official Roman policy, but due to a British usurper named Caurausius declaring himself the Emperor of Britain in 287 A.D. Having been cut off from the supply of coins from official Roman mints, Caurausius thus set up his own Mint in London to fulfil the demand for coin in his rebellious realm.
In 296, Constantius Chlorus (father of Constantine the Great) re-conquered Britain, but decided to keep the Mint open to supply local needs. The mint remained open until 325, although the mint was briefly revived for five years in 383. Roman Coins of the London Mint carry the following mintmarks on the reverse:

L, LI, LN, LON, ML, MLL. MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON.
For obvious reasons, Roman coins minted at the London Mint are quite popular with British collectors.



Edit: An interesting article here on the PAS by Sam Moorhead.
https://finds.org.uk/counties/blog/coin ... erp-nummi/

Evan
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alloverover
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Saffron wrote: Mon Sep 20, 2021 9:18 pm Many thanks for that.

So my two "soldiers" were "Victories" :oops:


That "Edit" is very interesting. As I knew that most coins were minted in Rome initially then other cities in mainland Europe rather than London so did a quick google and found this on https://24carat.co.uk/frame.php?url=rom ... nmint.html


London Mint Roman Coins

In the early days of the Roman Empire, almost every coin in circulation in the Empire was struck in Rome and diffused throughout the Empire. However, during the crisis of the third century, the sheer volume of coins required during this hyperinflationary period meant that the Roman Mint could no longer cope alone. As a consequence, mints were set up in various cities around the Empire, each with their own mintmark to denote the origin of the coin (e.g. 'Ant' for Antioch).
However, in the case of the London mint, the reason it was set up was not due to official Roman policy, but due to a British usurper named Caurausius declaring himself the Emperor of Britain in 287 A.D. Having been cut off from the supply of coins from official Roman mints, Caurausius thus set up his own Mint in London to fulfil the demand for coin in his rebellious realm.
In 296, Constantius Chlorus (father of Constantine the Great) re-conquered Britain, but decided to keep the Mint open to supply local needs. The mint remained open until 325, although the mint was briefly revived for five years in 383. Roman Coins of the London Mint carry the following mintmarks on the reverse:

L, LI, LN, LON, ML, MLL. MLN, MSL, PLN, PLON.
For obvious reasons, Roman coins minted at the London Mint are quite popular with British collectors.



Edit: An interesting article here on the PAS by Sam Moorhead.
https://finds.org.uk/counties/blog/coin ... erp-nummi/

Evan
Always nice to find London mint coins Evan :thumbsup:
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