Window slit Age?

Post Reply
User avatar
coal digger
Posts: 465
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2020 3:07 pm
Has thanked: 330 times
Been thanked: 576 times

Hi guys. A strange id request but thought I would give it a pop. So I'm working on a farm for a while and been looking around the many outbuildings and these window types caught my eye. In lobbing the detecting stick in the van tomorrow to have a flick around. Any ideas of Age of these types of window slots? Cheers.
Attachments
IMG_6414.JPG
Divide and Conquer
User avatar
coal digger
Posts: 465
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2020 3:07 pm
Has thanked: 330 times
Been thanked: 576 times

Forgot to say the reveal is angled.
Divide and Conquer
User avatar
Easylife
Posts: 9394
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2020 2:47 am
Location: Valhalla
Has thanked: 9524 times
Been thanked: 8388 times

Maybe a defensive arrowslit?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrowslit
D2 - 13"x11" coil - audio only.
Pete E
Posts: 2696
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2020 10:05 pm
Location: North Wales
Has thanked: 3499 times
Been thanked: 2284 times

coal digger wrote: Tue Oct 26, 2021 4:30 pm Hi guys. A strange id request but thought I would give it a pop. So I'm working on a farm for a while and been looking around the many outbuildings and these window types caught my eye. In lobbing the detecting stick in the van tomorrow to have a flick around. Any ideas of Age of these types of window slots? Cheers.
I have pondered this myself as it's a very common feature on "old" stone barns here in Wales....The thing is, most of these barns are no older than early 1800's and there are no comparable features on the associated farmhouses of the same period...

I actually asked a couple of farmers and they simply said it's to allow a degree of ventilation, but I doubt they were architectural historians!

I will be very interest if anyone can provide any firm evidence they were originally a defensive feature....
Metalurgy
Posts: 1505
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2021 3:02 pm
Has thanked: 1448 times
Been thanked: 1468 times

I believe the farmers are probably right,not uncommon on farm buildings and probably no older than Georgian at a push,more likely early Victorian.
User avatar
figgis
Posts: 6915
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2020 6:21 pm
Location: Norfolk (just)
Has thanked: 3996 times
Been thanked: 4665 times

Ya know, I've seen a fair few ID requests on MD forums - some made of stone - but a wall is, I believe, a first for me :lol:

But thanks for that, CD - we love the unusual here, chap :thumbsup:
User avatar
Saffron
Posts: 1802
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2020 7:31 pm
Has thanked: 2479 times
Been thanked: 2335 times

I can not help with the age; but I can confirm that they were for ventilation and are not arrow slits.

The slits were primarily for ventilation—to allow air to move around the stored grain and hay. Without air moving, heat can build up in grain and hay, in some cases hot enough to burst into flame—what is called spontaneous combustion. It’s usually caused by decomposition heat—any moisture in the hay or grain will start composting, which generates heat. And there was generally a great deal of dust in the air around stored grain and hay—which is easy to ignite. Even in modern times the explosion of grain elevators happens, sometimes catastrophically.

Due to being narrow on the external side of the wall it minimises the amount of rain that can enter, while being wide on the internal side it allows the maximum amount of light in.

They are nearly always wide enough to allow barn owls to enter, as the farmers liked having the owls in the barns as they helped to control the mice and rats.

Evan
Post Reply