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Steve_JT
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Having worked with cows in the past, they can be unpredictable, if your not aware of the dangers don't go anywhere near them, in my experience those with calves are the worst ones to be amongst.

When bringing in calves from the field we used to put them on a trailer or open carrier on the back of a tractor and the mother followed, even the non mothers are protective about new born calves so beware.

If you've got a dog and cows are becoming a threat let it loose, the cows will chase the dog, but bottom line is don't go in a field of animals with a dog.

regards Steve
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shaggybfc
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I once got spooked. One permission has sheep in it - 2 large fields connected by a gateway through the hedge. I rocked up, got kitted out and off I went wandering around in my own world with the sheep mostly ignoring me. I was crouched down retrieving a find when I got this strange feeling that I was being watched. I stood up, turned around and there, all looking at me were 12 young ninja bullocks - made me jump a bit. I didn’t hear them at all. They were fine, just inquisitive but I did leave the field.
I also had the same with a horse - crouched down retrieving the find and dirty great big horse stuck its head over my shoulder and tried to eat my Garrett carrot, and my hand.
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keyfits
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Steve_JT wrote: Wed Nov 03, 2021 1:40 pm Having worked with cows in the past, they can be unpredictable, if your not aware of the dangers don't go anywhere near them, in my experience those with calves are the worst ones to be amongst.

When bringing in calves from the field we used to put them on a trailer or open carrier on the back of a tractor and the mother followed, even the non mothers are protective about new born calves so beware.

If you've got a dog and cows are becoming a threat let it loose, the cows will chase the dog, but bottom line is don't go in a field of animals with a dog.

regards Steve
Very good advice. There are a lot of right of ways through fields with cows in and probably a lot of walkers and detectorists that don't understand the dangers, although most cows are just curious theres always the chance that one cow is having a bad day or is just outright dangerous maybe due to a previous bad experience and see people as a threat, as you have stated especially when calves are present. If you find yourself in a field of cows always have an escape plan should you need it and read up on cows danger signs. One thing that I bet a lot of people don't know is never stand next to a cows back leg as they can kick out side ways.
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keyfits
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shaggybfc wrote: Wed Nov 03, 2021 3:03 pm I once got spooked. One permission has sheep in it - 2 large fields connected by a gateway through the hedge. I rocked up, got kitted out and off I went wandering around in my own world with the sheep mostly ignoring me. I was crouched down retrieving a find when I got this strange feeling that I was being watched. I stood up, turned around and there, all looking at me were 12 young ninja bullocks - made me jump a bit. I didn’t hear them at all. They were fine, just inquisitive but I did leave the field.
I also had the same with a horse - crouched down retrieving the find and dirty great big horse stuck its head over my shoulder and tried to eat my Garrett carrot, and my hand.
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I will definitely NOT enter a field with cows, had a few bad experiences with them the last one about three months ago having been chased across a field by about a dozen young boisterous cows just managing to clamber over the gate as they were nudging my leg!!......a horrible experience. This permission has now gone belly up as I’ve been told by one of the farmhands that the cattle will be left out more in the winter now as they are struggling for room in the cowsheds and they move them around the fields each day so it’s a lottery now whether you get caught with no escape route, so I’m uncertain as to whether it’s a viable permission anymore. :thumbdown:
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keyfits
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I know what you mean. I tend to do the same when it comes to choosing a field to detect, if one of the better fields I had planned to detect is full of cows I will divert to another permission.
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keyfits wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 8:46 am I know what you mean. I tend to do the same when it comes to choosing a field to detect, if one of the better fields I had planned to detect is full of cows I will divert to another permission.
We only have the heifers out until about now,having trashed my car and bringing a plague of flies with them,I now avoid them.
That said,I’ve never had a problem other than the above,perhaps because I was brought up in a farming community I’ve never worried when they come up close and get in your face,in fact I enjoy their company and think that they’re all lovely,if it wasn’t for the flies.
I’m sure that like most animals they sense fear or anxiety and perhaps there in lies the problem for some.
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keyfits
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Metalurgy wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 10:02 am We only have the heifers out until about now,having trashed my car and bringing a plague of flies with them,I now avoid them.
That said,I’ve never had a problem other than the above,perhaps because I was brought up in a farming community I’ve never worried when they come up close and get in your face,in fact I enjoy their company and think that they’re all lovely,if it wasn’t for the flies.
I’m sure that like most animals they sense fear or anxiety and perhaps there in lies the problem for some.
Never bothered me either until the two issues in a short space of time. I still go in with cows occasionally but only if there is no other viable option, but when i do I always keep an eye out for potential problems as fear and anxiety is with me and they know it!!!!
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Saffron
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Coming from a countryside background, my father worked on a farm for most of his life and as a youngster I was always around the farm.

I can assure you that issues with cows on their own are infrequent (although not unknown). The bulk of the problems are when they have calves with them and they are being protective to their young.

When people are injured (or sadly in very rare circumstances killed) where they have dogs its normally "accidental" where the cows are actually trying to get at the dog, which tries to hide behind the owner, and purely because the person has found themselves between the cows and dog.

As a detectorist I would never worry about detecting in a field with cows (without calves). However, I would be reluctant to go in the same field with a dog.

Horses never worry me, and most of my permission are equine, and I frequently find myself surrounded by half a dozen or more (my only concern is that when digging a hole they might accidentally step on the detector!). But saying that I do know the difference between a mare, gelding and a stallion .... a stallion in the spring when the mares are in season might be a different matter.

But with both cattle and horses I would NEVER park a car in the same field !!. I have know a lot of wing / door mirrors to be destroyed by both, and in some cases other damage being done.

As has been said before I am certain that animals detect fear, and I am confident around livestock. If you are not then you might well feel happier detecting in fields with no animals in them.

With my background and confidence around livestock I am happy to detect in a field of cows, somebody who has no experience around them and is very nervous probably would be better off avoiding the same field.

In all cases when detecting it is up to us as individuals to evaluate the potential risks and take sensible precautions.

Evan
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keyfits
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Saffron wrote: Thu Nov 04, 2021 11:20 pm Coming from a countryside background, my father worked on a farm for most of his life and as a youngster I was always around the farm.

I can assure you that issues with cows on their own are infrequent (although not unknown). The bulk of the problems are when they have calves with them and they are being protective to their young.

When people are injured (or sadly in very rare circumstances killed) where they have dogs its normally "accidental" where the cows are actually trying to get at the dog, which tries to hide behind the owner, and purely because the person has found themselves between the cows and dog.

As a detectorist I would never worry about detecting in a field with cows (without calves). However, I would be reluctant to go in the same field with a dog.

Horses never worry me, and most of my permission are equine, and I frequently find myself surrounded by half a dozen or more (my only concern is that when digging a hole they might accidentally step on the detector!). But saying that I do know the difference between a mare, gelding and a stallion .... a stallion in the spring when the mares are in season might be a different matter.

But with both cattle and horses I would NEVER park a car in the same field !!. I have know a lot of wing / door mirrors to be destroyed by both, and in some cases other damage being done.

As has been said before I am certain that animals detect fear, and I am confident around livestock. If you are not then you might well feel happier detecting in fields with no animals in them.

With my background and confidence around livestock I am happy to detect in a field of cows, somebody who has no experience around them and is very nervous probably would be better off avoiding the same field.

In all cases when detecting it is up to us as individuals to evaluate the potential risks and take sensible precautions.

Evan
Yes Saffron, I think you have got it spot on.
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shaggybfc
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Batman
Batman wrote: Wed Nov 03, 2021 9:05 pm I will definitely NOT enter a field with cows, had a few bad experiences with them the last one about three months ago having been chased across a field by about a dozen young boisterous cows just managing to clamber over the gate as they were nudging my leg!!......a horrible experience.
Apologies, this made me chuckle. I had the image of burly Batman, dressed in costume running away from cows and the theme tune playing. :lol: :lol: That's where the Joker, the Penguin, and cat-woman went wrong - they should have been Cow-man (or Cow-woman)[or Cow-gender-fluid] :D
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keyfits
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Pete E wrote: Wed Nov 03, 2021 1:23 pm The main thing around cattle is not to have a dog with you....Even the most docile cows will chase a dog. Unfortunately what then usually happens is the dog runs back to the owner, resulting in the cattle trampling the person to death.

Every year I hear of two or three dog walkers being killed like that. Usually the cattle have, or are about to calve, but not always....
Won't be getting a dog then!!! I only read up on cows behaviour after my first encounter with Sunday dinner and after digesting the warning signs I think it spooked me even more. Who ever wrote "keep your enimies nearer?
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