Brass horse noseband

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Saffron
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An old workmate kindly invited me along to the club dig he was organising on Sunday.

A very large field of old stubble which looked promising. This was supported by the first signal being a coin, although only an old halfpenny it was a good start suggesting activity in the field. :thumbsup:

Well I was correct there must have been lots of activity in the field by the number of buttons, which run the amount of small bits of random lead a close second on the finds list :pulling hair out:

But I did make one very nice find a complete brass horse noseband, a first for me, additionally it was an item that could be researched :Party:
I suspect a complete one is a fairly rare detecting find, and I have never seen one before.

A clean revealed the makers name "T.I.POOK" and the location was Bedminster.

I found him in the 1871 census. Tom I Pook, who was born in 1838 at Stapleton Gloucestershire, he lived at 12 East Street, "Jolly Sailor", Bedminster and gave his occupation as as "Sadler & Inn Keeper" (an interesting combination, but a lot of inns were small and the innkeeper often had another occupation). Living with him was his wife Harriett, their 3 children, and a live in general servant.

Otherwise it was just two halfpennies, two plain buckles and a musket ball (which surprisingly I have not had for some time). But it shows that one really good find can often make the day.

My grandfather was a carter and I have all his horse brasses. Normally I would not try to restore a find like this to its original condition but in this case I am very tempted to as it would go well with those.

The following background is taken from the http://www.nationalhorsebrasssociety.org.uk/ site
"Another form of decoration was the noseband plate which was attached by two threaded studs and secured to the noseband with nuts, with an internal leather cover to protect the horses' nose. These were often hinged, either in the centre or using two side hinges allowing for movement with the horse's breathing. These produced an ideal 'advertising medium' for saddlers and harness makers to display their name and town or village in which they traded".

An unexpected bonus of this find was that while trying to find information about it I found another one online that was made only 5 miles from where I live, so I posted the photo of that on the local "Days Gone By" FB page with the details that I found out about that maker, and it generated a fair bit of interest.

I was also pleased that everybody returned to the cars and formed a group and marked the silence at eleven o'clock to remember those that gave their lives in the Great War, and subsequently.

Evan
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Easylife
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Al nice find which should look great cleaned up. :thumbsup:
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bob79
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I do like those horse brasses Evan, only found one complete, had a few halves. Think it needs a bit of Evan love to bring it back to it former glory.
Dave The Slave
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Interesting find, Evan.
Never seen one of these before and with the bonus of a complete back story.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
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DaveP
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Saffron wrote: Fri Nov 19, 2021 1:00 pm
My grandfather was a carter and I have all his horse brasses. Normally I would not try to restore a find like this to its original condition but in this case I am very tempted to as it would go well with those.

Evan
Good story and I like how you found the history and the connection to your grandfather.

In my opinion it has to be restored. There's always a debate about removing patina. To my mind this isn't patina, it's just corrosion and no horseman or carter would be seen dead with brasses in that condition. They were always meant to be well looked after and on show. In fact, I'm sure your grandfather would tell you to shine it up and do it proud.
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Nice find Saffron :thumbsup: and sound advice by DaveP :clapping: Now get you down them old shops and buy some Brasso :lol:
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Saffron
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Very many thanks for all the comments.

When found it did have some "green patina" but it was not very good and was patchy. It also had much more of the corrosion (might not be the correct word in this case but you know what I mean). As a result of which it was impossible to read the makers name and location, which are vital to establishing its history.

However, before attempting to clean it I had seen restored examples and how well they looked and felt if restored it would match my grandfathers harnesses. As a result I cleaned it to this intermediate state (which I believe is much better), so I could establish the maker and location, before deciding to fully restore it or not.

In this case everybody that has commented agrees it should be restored, so I will try to do so. But I think it needs more than just Brasso (others I know that were restored needed gentle treetment from a dremel) - This is NOT suggesting this is the correct course of action for other finds.

Evan
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Easylife
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I would expect that a good going over with a brass brush alone would do it wonders. :thumbsup:
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I know you will do the right thing when it comes to restoring it if that`s the way you decide to go :?: Saffron
but i just wonder what a old Hoss man in the late 1800`s would have thought or done if he saw someone cleaning his Hoss brasses with a Dremel :lol: :lol:
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Gleaner wrote: Fri Nov 19, 2021 11:21 pm
I just wonder what a old Hoss man in the late 1800`s would have thought or done if he saw someone cleaning his Hoss brasses with a Dremel :lol: :lol:
No doubt pure witchcraft! :shock:
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Saffron
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Gleaner wrote: Fri Nov 19, 2021 11:21 pm I know you will do the right thing when it comes to restoring it if that`s the way you decide to go :?: Saffron
but i just wonder what a old Hoss man in the late 1800`s would have thought or done if he saw someone cleaning his Hoss brasses with a Dremel :lol: :lol:
He might well have thought "I wish I had one of those it would same me a lot of time" :rollinglaughing:

But the tuth of the matter is that all the harnesses and brasses would always be kept in tip top condition, so would only require a frequent reasonably quick clean.
As Dave said "It's just corrosion and no horseman or carter would be seen dead with brasses in that condition. They were always meant to be well looked after and on show."

I know somebody that found a half and had it cleaned and restored. I will find out how he did it, of if he got somebody to do it. I might give it a bit more work by hand to see what improvement that makes. But I certainly will NOT be considering any thing as drastic as dremel without advice from reliable sources.

Evan
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