What on earth is this doing in a Northumberland field.

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Reiver
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Had a few hours out today on a pasture permission that has been extensively searched and signals are drying up.

Chose this small pasture field to try out a new coil , the 15" coil tek for the Nox.
So far the new coil seems to be bringing up on average another 16 targets per field 90%of which required further digging once the plug was out, make of that what you will.

One of those targets was this silver 2 Reales of Charles 4th of Spain dated 1794. Minted in Mexico , I think ? Am happy to be corrected if wrong.

You have to ask yourself, what on earth is this doing in a rural pasture field in Northumberland ?

This hobby of ours never ceases to amaze !
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JohnDeus
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I often wonder why unusual coins pop up England fields and i blame those bloody tourists :lol:
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Easylife
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A nice find. :thumbsup:
D2 - 13"x11" coil - audio only.
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Littleboot
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The kind of find which definitely reinvigorates interest in a permission. Seems like the new coil is doing that too!
We may while away the dark winter evenings perusing maps, doing research and looking for crop marks on Google Earth but the reality is we never really know and just when you think you have sussed a permission out, something really left-field ends up in looking up at you from the clod. :lol:
My permissions are in the back of beyond in rural Normandy. Yours are probably the equivalent in Northumberland. I found a Piece of Eight in a field near a quiet hamlet. All the way from a silver mine in Colombia. Mind boggling. I have found Swiss, Italian, German, Dutch, Russian, Spanish, Argentinian, Belgian, and British coins in the fields around my home. Odd I suppose. But maybe it is because we know where they come from whereas artefacts we find may also have come just as far but we are less likely to discover this.
I love these foreign anomalies. It makes for lots of imagination and speculation as you say. I always think of Pirates when I see coins such as yours. Errol Flynn swashing and buckling and jigging in the rigging. :lol:
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
Reiver
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Littleboot wrote: Sun Nov 21, 2021 9:51 pm The kind of find which definitely reinvigorates interest in a permission. Seems like the new coil is doing that too!
We may while away the dark winter evenings perusing maps, doing research and looking for crop marks on Google Earth but the reality is we never really know and just when you think you have sussed a permission out, something really left-field ends up in looking up at you from the clod. :lol:
My permissions are in the back of beyond in rural Normandy. Yours are probably the equivalent in Northumberland. I found a Piece of Eight in a field near a quiet hamlet. All the way from a silver mine in Colombia. Mind boggling. I have found Swiss, Italian, German, Dutch, Russian, Spanish, Argentinian, Belgian, and British coins in the fields around my home. Odd I suppose. But maybe it is because we know where they come from whereas artefacts we find may also have come just as far but we are less likely to discover this.
I love these foreign anomalies. It makes for lots of imagination and speculation as you say. I always think of Pirates when I see coins such as yours. Errol Flynn swashing and buckling and jigging in the rigging. :lol:
That's some collection of international coins you've found in rural Normandy Jan.

As you say ,can't beat a bit of swash and buckle. !!! 8-)
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Oxgirl
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Love a mystery foreign coin. I’ve found 18th century Indian coins and ones from Senegal in my fields. It makes the hobby fun though doesn’t it :D
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
Reiver
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Oxgirl wrote: Sun Nov 21, 2021 10:09 pm Love a mystery foreign coin. I’ve found 18th century Indian coins and ones from Senegal in my fields. It makes the hobby fun though doesn’t it :D
It certainly does ! :thumbsup:
Pete E
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It just shows how well travelled our ancestors actually were especially by the 18th centaury..

Even well before then trade was following conferrable distance, especially considering how poor transport was...

As an example, a few weeks ago, I took my grandson around the BA copper mine, in Llandudno on the North Wales coast and while reading the various displays, it mentioned just how far the copper from the mine was traded... Analysis of the metal taken from archaeological digs showed it had been used to manufacture BA artifacts discovered in modern Belgium and in one of the coastal regions of Scandinavia..

They are speculating the copper was used in artifacts from even further afield across Europe, and are supporting ongoing research relating to this....
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Saffron
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Without another ugently needed cup of coffee I can not remember the exact details, so this might be a bit vague.

I read that in the past European coins of roughly the same value were roughly the same size, this was due to originally the metal (gold / silver) value of the coin being its face value. Even in medieval times there was a lot more trade around Europe than we are apt to think of now. So this could easily result in coins of different countries becoming mixed. So the odd one is likely to have been dropped in remote fields where now there seems no logic.

Then there was the "Age of Empire" when several European countries claimed lands from all around the world, which would have accounted for coins from much further afield during this period.

But modern coins are likely to be from tourists, and I always like finding one ... I keep thinking one day I will mark off the countries I have found them from on a map .... maybe one day.

Evan
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Littleboot
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Oxgirl wrote: Sun Nov 21, 2021 10:09 pm Love a mystery foreign coin. I’ve found 18th century Indian coins and ones from Senegal in my fields. It makes the hobby fun though doesn’t it :D
Blimey Cath, Senegal! :o
What about a sticky thread with coins from foriegn parts and see how many we can tick off? Should be very eye-opening!
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
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Littleboot
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Saffron wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 10:26 am Without another ugently needed cup of coffee I can not remember the exact details, so this might be a bit vague.

I read that in the past European coins of roughly the same value were roughly the same size, this was due to originally the metal (gold / silver) value of the coin being its face value. Even in medieval times there was a lot more trade around Europe than we are apt to think of now. So this could easily result in coins of different countries becoming mixed. So the odd one is likely to have been dropped in remote fields where now there seems no logic.

But modern coins are likely to be from tourists, and I always like finding one ... I keep thinking one day I will mark off the countries I have found them from on a map .... maybe one day.

Evan
Great minds think alike as we cross-posted.
And yes you are right about the European coins of the 19th century being roughly the same size for that reason. In fact there was a kind of monetary union where some countries had coins of EXACTLY the same size and value. I think it included France, Italy, Switzerland and Belgium and Holland plus a few surprising ones. (I have an inkling Imperial Russia was involved as well but could be wrong.) Interchangeable and kind of like the Euro. Also like the era of the Euro the UK was sort of involved, but not officially. So there was some slight difference but not enough to matter over-much to people going about their daily business.
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
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Saffron
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Littleboot wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 10:29 am Blimey Cath, Senegal! :o
What about a sticky thread with coins from foriegn parts and see how many we can tick off? Should be very eye-opening!
I do like that idea :thumbsup:

The downside is that I would have to try and dig all of mine out again :thumbdown: :oops:

But IF somebody is going to keep a master "tick sheet" it might be worth splitting into two. One for those found in the UK, and another for those found by our members in other countries.

Evan
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Littleboot
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Pete E wrote: Mon Nov 22, 2021 9:15 am It just shows how well travelled our ancestors actually were especially by the 18th centaury..

Even well before then trade was following conferrable distance, especially considering how poor transport was...

As an example, a few weeks ago, I took my grandson around the BA copper mine, in Llandudno on the North Wales coast and while reading the various displays, it mentioned just how far the copper from the mine was traded... Analysis of the metal taken from archaeological digs showed it had been used to manufacture BA artifacts discovered in modern Belgium and in one of the coastal regions of Scandinavia..

They are speculating the copper was used in artifacts from even further afield across Europe, and are supporting ongoing research relating to this....
That wouldn't surprise me at all Pete. I think many people continually under-estimate the people of the past. I know that British tin and copper travelled far and wide from early times. In the UK my uncle used to farm on a big hill in the Peak district whih was riddled with mines dating back to before the Romans. Here in Normandy i found a Neolithic polished axe which came from what amounted to a factory in a granite quarry in Brittany, over 200 miles away to the West, which traded these all over northern Europe. fascinating.
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
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