Bottle dig , a winters project

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Kenleyboy
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Every now and again I get the chance to have a dig on a local Farm , one that I have written about before . There are restrictions as there are a lot of shoots on the land so time is limited . I have had some really good finds from there and it is a very shallow dig. Further along there are some derelict farm workers cottages which have fallen into decay . They are lovely old buildings , cloaked in undergrowth which is nigh on impossible to have any access due to the almost jungle like conditions .
Recently there has been some clearing as there are plans to either demolish or possibly re build but the damage is extensive so we will wait and see . There are a number of old decayed buildings like this across the county , lost in time for one reason or another and hidden away from view and long forgotten . It is a strange feeling wandering around old buildings knowing that once upon a time there was so much energy and life where everyday living continued and then suddenly it comes to an abrupt end , no rhyme nor reason and often mythical tales abound as to what happened how and why .
bottle tip cottage 1.jpg
This is a typical Norfolk farmworkers cottage , small and quaint , flint and red brick with ancient doors and latches that must have opened and shut a thousand or more times throughout the existence of the family living there . With this in mind in amongst the undergrowth there must be a tip , and it didn't take too long to find some potential areas that were worth investigating .
My digging buddy and I set of late this evening , it was still quite warm so we were not armed to the teeth with any proper digging tools . One probe and a fork just enough to do a test dig but more of an exploration than anything . The first sign of stinging nettles is a good give away yet here there was a vast swathe of them on relatively flat land . It was a case of scanning the ground eyes only for any signs of glass or crockery shards , if there was a concentrated area of shards then it was a likely spot to test dig . We were also looking for any signs of ash from a coal or log fire , this too would have been thrown into any pit that was dug to dispose of rubbish from the dwellings . It wasn't tooling before we found a promising spot where the ground shrunk into a dip , nettles protruding and this gave way for a rummage about .
The photograph is not the best but it gives and indication as to what we are looking for .
bottle tip hunt ditch 2.jpg
A bit of digging and it produced some shards but it was going to be hard work due to the roots but soon we unearthed some shards which earmarked this as one area to have a proper dig .
shards from ditch 3.jpg
With one likely looking area a tick off the list we moved on through the undergrowth , it was a bit of a game clambering over fallen trees and avoiding the branches and thicket bushes plus it was hot in the enclosure of the wooded area but continue we did until finally we found an old ash pit which looked promising . The probe chinked away as it found glass , a lot of it was broken and also a little too late for us , we wanted the early stuff , this ws more 60s era but was interesting enough knowing we were finding stuff .
These are the bottles from the ash with an intact light bulb , how the hell they survive I do not know but they do .
2nd test hole.jpg
Moving on we come to the old boundary wall , once again , flint with red brick . These are good spots for old bottles , chuck over the wall , out of sight out of mind . Here we found more bottle but once again these were too late but still had potential .
wall finds.jpg
Somewhere within the confines of the undergrowth there is an early tip and there are three ponds , two full of water and one dry but such was the density of the undergrowth we could not get near to it so we have decided to put this one on the back burner until winter when everything has died back allowing us to explore a little more .
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Bors
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Just like the American Gangster then, " Slim Pickings " :cry:
Things aint cooking in my kitchen
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Kenleyboy
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Bors wrote: Sun Aug 09, 2020 11:17 pm Just like the American Gangster then, " Slim Pickings " :cry:
Early days yet Bors . Just a quick recce on the site . Its going to take some time to find what we are looking for but definitely worth a scout about but one for the winter . :thumbsup:
Blackadder43
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Another angle to the hobby, the research :thumbsup:
You can also see why 2 of you is best as you root through that lot like David Bellamy

What do you use as a probing stick/rod?
I would have thought wood, but you mentioned a chinking sound, so assume its metal?
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Kenleyboy
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Blackadder43 wrote: Mon Aug 10, 2020 12:26 am Another angle to the hobby, the research :thumbsup:
You can also see why 2 of you is best as you root through that lot like David Bellamy

What do you use as a probing stick/rod?
I would have thought wood, but you mentioned a chinking sound, so assume its metal?
Bottle probe is a sprung steel rod 1/4 inch diameter and 5 ft long with a metal cross bar for the handle . Nice and flexible and very strong .
Dave The Slave
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Looks like you have another project for the winter.
Love the derelict cottage.
Got to be glassware and ceramics dating back to when they were built, which was?
There used to be some farm cottages down the road, now gone but the Apple and plum trees are still fruiting. Some of the boundary walls exist going down to the river. Can`t get permission there, as now a Council Nature reserve.
Looking forward to seeing what you can dig up, Paul.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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