Keep aware of storms...

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Ladybird66
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Easylife wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:15 pm Same here in the Midlands it just doesn't seem fair! :lol: I'm waiting for a paddock to get a soaking before I detect it so that the grass doesn't die off. :thumbsup:
Another example of how patchy these storms have been. My eldest Son is up in the Midlands sent me a short video clip of the lightening and rain and the soundtrack was enhanced by his ‘silly moo’ neighbour screaming !
So at least part of the Midlands had a watering.
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Easylife
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Ladybird66 wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 9:42 pm Another example of how patchy these storms have been. My eldest Son is up in the Midlands sent my a short video clip of the lightening and rain and the soundtrack was enhanced by his ‘silly moo’ neighbour screaming !
So at least part of the Midlands had a watering.
The southern bit only so far. Rain forecast here Sun, Mon, Tue - so looks like maybe detecting Wed, Fri & Sun to complete a project. :thumbsup:
D2 - 13"x11" coil - audio only.
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Saffron
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DaveP wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 8:16 am You'd be surprised how quickly grown men can move when you're sitting in the middle of The Channel with a bunch of carbon composite fishing rods pointed upwards! It's almost like a cartoon comedy - "Storm!" or "Lightning!" and in a microsecond every line is in and the rods laid flat on the deck at the back of the boat and a little gaggle at the front in the wheelhouse :lol:

Good reminder Jan.
Try fishing a match on a lake with a 16 metre pole to an island. Suddenly that "second line" under the bush just by you seems a very attractive option :D :D (I am not a whimp ... its a match and money at stake ...... but a pleasure session might well result in a withdraw to the car!)

But Davep's avatar of a pheasant is the best "thunder and lightening detector" I have ever known. Many a time I have been out and the cock pheasants have started calling when I could hear or see nothing to disturb them, then a short while after a thunder storm has moved in.

Evan
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Saffron
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When I think of lightening I think of the dangers of trees and such like, but beaches are not exempt from lightening stikes as this photo taken a few days ago shows (copied with permission from the UK beach detecting FB site).

The strike would have fused the sand and formed a glass Fulgurite.

Evan
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Steve RC
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Never seen one, but there is i am told a fossil lightning strike in a rock outcrop on the Isle of Arran formed about 250 million years ago.
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TheFenTiger
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Use this site to see where the strikes are hitting and if they start getting close, stop detecting.

www.lightningmaps.org
Dave
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Ladybird66
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figgis wrote: Fri Aug 14, 2020 5:45 am A good and timely reminder, Jan :thumbsup:

Wish I had the opportunity to use the advice. While the rest of the country (and, it seems, Europe) have been soaked, there's not been a sniff of a storm here. We've had the heat and humidity but nothing to go with it.

I do love storms and maybe we'll get one today :D But I've been saying that since Wednesday :thumbdown:
What did I say the other day. Our turn will come, the trouble with Wales is when it does, it doesn’t know when to stop.
I think our turn came today. I’ve been daft enough to try and do normal 2 walks and got soaked through to me knickers this morning and rather wet round the edges tonight :cry: and it’s still pouring. :thumbdown:

Bright side ! The lawns looking good :thumbsup: Down side ! It’s going to need cutting again :thumbdown:
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Ladybird66
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Saffron wrote: Sat Aug 15, 2020 5:55 pm When I think of lightening I think of the dangers of trees and such like, but beaches are not exempt from lightening stikes as this photo taken a few days ago shows (copied with permission from the UK beach detecting FB site).

The strike would have fused the sand and formed a glass Fulgurite.
:thumbsup:
Evan
Wonder what the attraction was for the lightening to strike there. Wonder if it was that mon-hole cover I re-buried :Thinking: :lol:

Great photo, thanks for posting :thumbsup:
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figgis
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Ladybird66 wrote: Mon Aug 17, 2020 8:47 pm I think our turn came today. I’ve been daft enough to try and do normal 2 walks and got soaked through to me knickers this morning and rather wet round the edges tonight :cry: and it’s still pouring. :thumbdown:
At the weekend I was listening to the storms and watching the lightning strikes in real time online. The storms were forming just to the south and west and travelling west. They were within touching distance but nothing overhead :thumbdown: Then at work yesterday the sky was as black as Newgate's knocker to the east and later to the south and west, loads of thunder, and what did we get? Nuffink, that's what. Not even a drop of rain and the excuse to bunk off early :evil:

I'm beginning to take it personally now.
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Ladybird66
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figgis wrote: Tue Aug 18, 2020 4:16 am At the weekend I was listening to the storms and watching the lightning strikes in real time online. The storms were forming just to the south and west and travelling west. They were within touching distance but nothing overhead :thumbdown: Then at work yesterday the sky was as black as Newgate's knocker to the east and later to the south and west, loads of thunder, and what did we get? Nuffink, that's what. Not even a drop of rain and the excuse to bunk off early :evil:

I'm beginning to take it personally now.
Morning John. Just be a good boy and serve your time then you can retire :thumbsup:
I had a lie-in this morning and was pleasantly surprised to see the Sun shining, so took my first cuppa, tablets & cigs into the conservatory to enjoy. Been in for 10 mins and guess what ? You got it, it’s raining again. Told ya, didn’t I :lol:
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Ladybird66
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Littleboot wrote: Thu Aug 13, 2020 10:03 pm Just a reminder to stay aware of the progress of weather systems as you detect.
I gather it is similar weather in Blighty at present....we have had extremely hot weather recently which has, inevitably, given way to a build up of storms and humidity. For three days in a row I have finished my work and then decided to detect nearby arable in the mid to late afternoon......and each time it has been a photo finish with the distant roll of thunder.
Thing is, with detectors being waterproof I am somewhat less aware of rain clouds because the days of struggling to protect my equipment from water have gone. Today i was detecting about 500 yards away from my home. Open arable land and no cover. I was happily pootling along and enjoying the fact that the signals were biting after some much needed rain. However, when i turned around I was shocked to see how angry the sky looked and, on removing my headphones, how loud and close the thunder actually was. It isn't always easy to see lightning in broad daylight but I definitely saw a flash of sheet lightning overhead. It was like a camera flash bathing everything.
Because I had been involved and my back was turned to the emerging storm it had crept up on me.
So i scuttled off home not a moment too soon. Within 5 minutes of getting indoors there was a crack of fork lightning in the direction i had come from.
We are in the middle of open fields and therefore susceptible to being struck. Please remain aware and regularly check out the sky all around you (storms have a nasty habit of going round you in a circle) at regular intervals. Take stock and form a judgement of where you would take shelter and how quickly you could get there. (You are perfectly safe from an electric storm in a car.)
If you can hear thunder then it is possible to be struck. That is a fact.
All very sound advice Jan. but I have to say, like you, I’ve been there, done that and didn’t think much of it.
Over the years, boy have I been caught in some storms. Makes me shiver thinking about it. Mainly because all of my hobbies have been outside. Amazingly horses don’t seem the slightest bit bothered by them, unlike me !
When I was a child I remember we used to get what were called ‘Electrical Storms’ they were hum-dingers. Not too often we get them now so worth reminding us how dangerous they can be.
The storms last week sounded very similar but as I’ve already said they went all around us. Like watching a fire work display from the safety of home.
One thing we can rely on in Wales is rain, sooner or later and now seems to be sooner. Watch out for the Westerlies. :o

Thanks for the post :thumbsup:
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People should be aware of “Upward lightning “
Caused by something on the ground that causes a positive cloud to ground flash, could be a person being the object, if you are using electronic equipment then that might cause it to occur even more?

Google it for an interesting read

A close or direct lightning strike will sometimes give you a short warning a few seconds before the event, usually in the form of: A soft or loud buzzing, clicking, hissing or cracking sound. A tingling sensation. Hairs on the arm or head standing on end.

Lightning doesn’t always strike the tallest object, if you can see lightning and hear thunder you are in the danger zone

https://stormhighway.com/safety.php

Regards Steve
A foolish faith in authority, is the worst enemy of truth." Albert Einstein
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