Eyes only OX shoe?

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Kenleyboy
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Pete E wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 9:47 am Quite possibly the holes have rusted over?
Possible , going to clean it up and rid the excess rust which is all blown and crusty , may show some definition .
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Kenleyboy wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 10:07 am Possible , going to clean it up and rid the excess rust which is all blown and crusty , may show some definition .
Maybe a good candidate for electrolysis? Lots of videos on YT showing good success on cleaning up rusty metal...
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Saffron
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Kenleyboy wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 8:20 am Thanks for this , not that horseshoes are my thing it is interesting to see a dateline on them and not being an expert hence my thoughts and question on a possible Ox shoe . I have never found one this small or shaped like this in one piece and judging by the illustration it looks similar to no4 so has some age .There are no holes in this shoe , just blank . :thumbsup:
Glad it was useful.

You become an expert on what you find. Hence I know about horseshoes, but know nothing about Roman, Saxon or Celtic :thumbdown: :(

Shoes of this type are not that common, as back in those days the average farmer would have had Oxen rather than horses. At that time most horses were smaller than todays thoroughbred horse / hunter, so I supect is from a small horse rather than pony.

As Pete said the holes would have become rusted over. If soaked in oil then thumped with a hammer you might well be able to see them, not that I am suggesting this approach!.
Edit: Got distracted (watching the oxen being shoed in the video earlier in the thread), so above comment about soaking in oil and thumping with hammer made before I saw the comments about cleaning it - it would be worth cleaning and give better definition.

Evan
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Kenleyboy
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Saffron wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 11:53 am Glad it was useful.

You become an expert on what you find. Hence I know about horseshoes, but know nothing about Roman, Saxon or Celtic :thumbdown: :(

Shoes of this type are not that common, as back in those days the average farmer would have had Oxen rather than horses. At that time most horses were smaller than todays thoroughbred horse / hunter, so I supect is from a small horse rather than pony.

As Pete said the holes would have become rusted over. If soaked in oil then thumped with a hammer you might well be able to see them, not that I am suggesting this approach!.
Edit: Got distracted (watching the oxen being shoed in the video earlier in the thread), so above comment about soaking in oil and thumping with hammer made before I saw the comments about cleaning it - it would be worth cleaning and give better definition.

Evan
Very useful :thumbsup: Considering we dig these up I am probably as guilty as the next person and just pop them in the scrap bag without a second thought . This one was literally poking out the soil and was of the type I had not seen or dug up before . From the humble horse shoe I have learnt something new and considering the age puts another angle on it . You never know what will show up next , a Bronze Age axe head would be nice , we live in hope !
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Kenleyboy wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 12:36 pm From the humble horse You never know what will show up next , a Bronze Age axe head would be nice , we live in hope !
In my case I know what will turn up: More horse shoes! :roll: :roll:
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Pete E wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 1:13 pm In my case I know what will turn up: More horse shoes! :roll: :roll:
Curiously I have never dug up a horse shoe, my club's land is all full of bits of hand grenade, .303s and bits of two inch mortar.

Our horses were obviously more heavily armed than yours...
That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.

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Pete E wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 1:13 pm In my case I know what will turn up: More horse shoes! :roll: :roll:
I know what you mean but you just never know , the next horse shoe signal could well be a Bronze Age axehead !
Couple of years ago while on a club dig just before kick off I had just poured myself a cuppa from the flask when the clubs organiser asked me if I would take the scrap bucket up into the middle of the field . Another member seeing my plight of a fresh cup offered to do the deed instead and came wandering back with a Stone Age axe head in his hand . There it lay on the top , so my cuppa caused me to miss that one . Just shows you what can and does lay on the top , thats why I always scan the fields when dog walking .
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Good find.
The bonus of an " eyes only " find is, one less signal to dig.
Sometimes when digging the umpteenth shottie, will say, " fast recovery"if spotted straight away, which nullifies the disappointment.
Have been lucky enough to find 3 or 4 ox shoes.
Good Luck, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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Saffron wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 2:25 am Easylife is spot on.

The shoe that Kenleyboy found is a very old horse / pony shoe.

The item that Ladybird thinks is a Oxshoe is just a broken horseshoe. These Caulkin horseshoes were much more common in the past with working horses, (as they had to pull heavy loads getting traction was harder), but they are still sometimes used these days.

Evan
OK. I’M bashed & battered into submission. It’s not an Ox shoe. BUT it’s as made, not worn thin or broken. The narrower end is definitely rounded and still has wear in it. Unfortunately it’s one of the many items I dumped when the old lean-to was replaced so I can’t re-photograph it. I reckon if it was a special, the poor horse had bigger problems with its feet than I do :D
I was reliably (I thought ) told it was a Ox shoe. I saw an Ox being shod on a documentary program some time ago. Did you know they have to put them in a special tilting kresh (spelling ?) because they can’t stand on 3 legs, they fall over :lol:
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Ladybird66 wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 5:01 pm OK. I’M bashed & battered into submission. It’s not an Ox shoe. BUT it’s as made, not worn thin or broken. The narrower end is definitely rounded and still has wear in it. Unfortunately it’s one of the many items I dumped when the old lean-to was replaced so I can’t re-photograph it. I reckon if it was a special, the poor horse had bigger problems with its feet than I do :D
I was reliably (I thought ) told it was a Ox shoe. I saw an Ox being shod on a documentary program some time ago. Did you know they have to put them in a special tilting kresh (spelling ?) because they can’t stand on 3 legs, they fall over :lol:
Fear not Ladybird , I've got your back :lol: I too thought it was an ox shoe but I did cover my butt with a question mark :D I am more surprised at how old it is and normally I don't bother with them but this was a dog walk and it would be foolish not to bring something home other than the dog poop bags :thumbsup:
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Ladybird66 wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 5:01 pm
OK. I’M bashed & battered into submission. It’s not an Ox shoe. BUT it’s as made, not worn thin or broken. The narrower end is definitely rounded and still has wear in it. Unfortunately it’s one of the many items I dumped when the old lean-to was replaced so I can’t re-photograph it. I reckon if it was a special, the poor horse had bigger problems with its feet than I do :D
I was reliably (I thought ) told it was a Ox shoe. I saw an Ox being shod on a documentary program some time ago. Did you know they have to put them in a special tilting kresh (spelling ?) because they can’t stand on 3 legs, they fall over :lol:
Val, we have all found items that somebody has then misidentified for us, so do not worry.

As its made that way as a "half-shoe", (a shoe which covers but one side of a horse's foot: used to correct some defect in the growth of the hoof), if the person knew that the due to the cloven hooves oxshoes were in 2 parts for each foot but had not seen one before I could see why that misidentification was made.

I do not know the state of your feet, but I am willing to bet that a lot of horses have more trouble with theirs than you do!.
By the look of yours it has some age to it. So could very well have come from a working horse. Therefore if you had a basically good horse with 3 good feet, but had problems in the other foot, you would try to resolve the problem with the foot. A bit like a modern tractor, if you got a puncture in the one tyre you would not scrap the tractor!. The farriers were very skilled and would have know how to make a wide range of corrective horseshoes, and you have found one.

Below is a modern version (credit Paulick report)

As for your comment about seeing an Ox being shod, the video linked to earlier in this thread shows one being shod and as you say its supported in a sling to stop it falling over. The video also shows the shoes and as in the chart I provide they are much wider than your corrective half-shoe for a horse.

Evan
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Mucky
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I have found quite a few ox shoes, the one's I find usually have a loop that encompasses the front of the pointed tip of a bovine animal.
I have just searched through the pics on my computer and am amazed I forgot to photograph any of them.
I gave them all to the landlord at my local because he was fascinated by them. The next time I find one I'll make sure I look after it with a bit of wire brushing and some metal sealant. Even some black Hammerite! :thumbsup:
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Saffron wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 6:41 pm
As its made that way as a "half-shoe", (a shoe which covers but one side of a horse's foot: used to correct some defect in the growth of the hoof), if the person knew that the due to the cloven hooves oxshoes were in 2 parts for each foot but had not seen one before I could see why that misidentification was made.

I do not know the state of your feet, but I am willing to bet that a lot of horses have more trouble with theirs than you do!.
By the look of yours it has some age to it. So could very well have come from a working horse. Therefore if you had a basically good horse with 3 good feet, but had problems in the other foot, you would try to resolve the problem with the foot. A bit like a modern tractor, if you got a puncture in the one tyre you would not scrap the tractor!. The farriers were very skilled and would have know how to make a wide range of corrective horseshoes, and you have found one.

Below is a modern version (credit Paulick report)

As for your comment about seeing an Ox being shod, the video linked to earlier in this thread shows one being shod and as you say its supported in a sling to stop it falling over. The video also shows the shoes and as in the chart I provide they are much wider than your corrective half-shoe for a horse.

Evan
Thanks for that Even...

I never knew half shoes even existed for horses. I suppose by their very nature they would be more easily lost than a standard shoe as well..I will have to pay attention next time I find what appears to be a broken standard horse shoe....
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Saffron wrote: Fri Aug 21, 2020 6:41 pm Val, we have all found items that somebody has then misidentified for us, so do not worry.

As its made that way as a "half-shoe", (a shoe which covers but one side of a horse's foot: used to correct some defect in the growth of the hoof), if the person knew that the due to the cloven hooves oxshoes were in 2 parts for each foot but had not seen one before I could see why that misidentification was made.

I do not know the state of your feet, but I am willing to bet that a lot of horses have more trouble with theirs than you do!.
By the look of yours it has some age to it. So could very well have come from a working horse. Therefore if you had a basically good horse with 3 good feet, but had problems in the other foot, you would try to resolve the problem with the foot. A bit like a modern tractor, if you got a puncture in the one tyre you would not scrap the tractor!. The farriers were very skilled and would have know how to make a wide range of corrective horseshoes, and you have found one.

Below is a modern version (credit Paulick report)

As for your comment about seeing an Ox being shod, the video linked to earlier in this thread shows one being shod and as you say its supported in a sling to stop it falling over. The video also shows the shoes and as in the chart I provide they are much wider than your corrective half-shoe for a horse.

Evan
Worry !? Me, no. Not for long anyway :thumbsup: I’ve had three horses and the one I rode was a pain in the (foot) he was off balance for months and we couldn’t get to the cause of it. Eventually a meeting was called with the Vet, Farrier, myself and a horsey neighbour in attendance. After examination, XRays and lots of discussion it was finally solved.
He had, wait for it, a displaced coffin bone in one front foot, was developing a spavin in the other and had consistently had his feet over trimmed on the heels by the previous owners Farrier.
As you said, you don’t throw out the Tractor because you have a puncture. It took best part of 6 months to get him right which included specially made shoes and daily walking but no riding. His name was Harequin Blue or Charlie to his friends. He was the best pal you could wish for and I had him for 14 years. The Farrier became a good friend and I’ll never forget the instruction ‘Short on the front long on the back’. Good Man :thumbsup:
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I've never seen anyone turn up a 'brass' horse shoe from a working horse or copper shoe nails. They were only used in specialised places but presume due to metal value they were recycled. Would be a different and interesting find.
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