Pond dig few stragglers

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Kenleyboy
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Clean up and make good puts you in good stead for a future permissions but its a mammoth task . We now think this pond was an old trash pit but originally was dug to extract the flint . The vast majority of Norfolk buildings etc were built using red brick and flint , the use of natural resources and flint being one of the most common stones which literally litter every corner of the county . The bed of the pond is compacted with varying sizes of natural flint , we have pulled out some the size of footballs , these are great to use to smack your shovels on to rid the sticky lumps of clay that cling to it like glue .
There is so much glass and crockery here it seems just too much for a few cottage tenants to have just randomly throw their junk out especially in the concentrations that we have been finding the bottles . True that no doubt they did sling stuff in like missiles but further investigation is proving that this was too compacted in certain areas to have just been a few individual homesteads that were dumping rubbish , it is almost on a small scale industrial tipping scheme .
The workers cottages were built in 1750 as was the main farmhouse which is now a private residence , there are also a few other random cottages along this one single track or now more like a gravelled lane . In a situation like this you have to try and re assess the task in hand and workout exactly what they were doing back then , was it just a few cottage tenants throwing out their rubbish into the pond ? Initially we thought this to be just the case and we were quite happy to extract some of the very early bottles etc that have become historically important to collectors of such items . Further investigations however have proved that this was not the case entirely and a much more concentrated effort was put forward to dump rubbish from the local residents .
pond bottles A.jpg
Some more bottles found plus a very desirable and surprising Victorian glass bird feeder in excellent condition , this we think pre dates the bottles and is a very encouraging find . We also found the top half of an early stoneware bottle otherwise described as a flask . This was crude and would pre date the bird feeder and if whole that would have been an amazing find due to its age .
The main task of yesterdays excursion was to tidy up with no real intention of any more digging but we chanced upon one area which again started to produce further bottles of mixed ages . The owner granted us permission to continue as the pond is now beginning to look a bit more tidier after our clean up . It is possible we may have to engage a mechanical digger to completely clear out but that is on the back burner for now and we are much happier to hand dig rather than use a machine but it is an option .
pond bottles B.jpg
The one area we have found to have potential is the bank along the side of the track which is about 20 yards long . The bottles and crockery appear to be along the edge and are a mix of Victorian and up into the late 20s era . As we dig further along the trench which thankfully is a dry area and about two feet deep and soft soil and sand eventually reveals a meter wide area which contains the bottles and the further out towards the pond the bottles become less concentrated and appear to be just a few sparse bottles here and there . This now brings us to realise that there was a deliberate intention to dump trash in and along this bank .
A typical system for dumping local trash was for example in this case and many others were no doubt carried out by a farm labourer who would collect everyones rubbish within the local community , horse and cart or just a barrow and then pick the easiest and less strenuous area to tip . Up the track to the pond and tip the barrow full of trash straight off the bank and job done and this process continued all along this bank where areas were chosen to tip and dump . It certainly gets your thinking cap on and you have to try and put yourself in their shoes and imagine what you would have done if this was your job to get rid of the neighbouring rubbish , so far this has proved to be the case .
Pond bottles C.jpg
pond bottles D bird feeder .jpg
We found two of these identical bird feeders , both in immaculate condition . Very fragile glass with intricate designs , typically Victorian two piece mould with sheared lip . How they survive we just don't know , stronger robust bottles suffer damage but these escaped the tumble down the bank and not even a scratch .
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Kenleyboy
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The early flask remnant . Crude stippled salt glaze to the extreme edges with smooth from and back . Unusual to find with a handle .
Shame its broken would have been a nice find if it were whole .
stoneware flask.jpg
Dave The Slave
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Every time i read one of your updates, Paul, learn something new. Have never heard of a birdfeeder before and your examples are ornate. Think i would have assumed they were perfume until trying to research.
Great finds and the landowner seems impressed with your restoration of the area.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
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Blackadder43
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I tried looking for info on the Birdfeeder bottles too, but ended up being shown how to make a bird feeder from a cola bottle :thumbdown:

Do you also have detecting permission for this area?
That would be interesting i expect :thumbsup:
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Kenleyboy
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Blackadder43 wrote: Thu Aug 27, 2020 2:40 pm I tried looking for info on the Birdfeeder bottles too, but ended up being shown how to make a bird feeder from a cola bottle :thumbdown:

Do you also have detecting permission for this area?
That would be interesting i expect :thumbsup:
The only reference I could find on the bird feeders was from a 1930s advert . They were made up until this time period . It would tie in with the dateline of the tip as it has been tipped since the Victorian period up until the thirties . I have had some conflicting views on the date line of the feeders some say Victorian while others 1920s-30s so its hard to pin down a dateline . It looks Victorian to me but if it was a faithful design that was popular it could run for a good time .

No metal detecting here , the original farmhouse had been sold of to private residence and the land was sold for development a few years ago . There is a very nice 17th century house a few hundred yards away and I was chatting with the owner who tells me he has three ponds that have bottles in as he found some while clearing and he has a bit of Land . He is going to help clear the pond of the mountains of rubbish and I shall have a word with him . Friendly chap but may change when I ask for permission , a lot of them do round these parts , almost like a personal insult :lol: :thumbsup:
Dave The Slave
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Co incidentally, on last nights , Thursday repeat episode of Celebrity Antiques Road Trip, Sharon Maughan & Tina Hobley, they purchased a bird feeder, which was plain to your example in comparison. BBC2 on catch up. Think they paid £15, can`t remember selling price.
Never watched these celeb episodes originally, so like watching a new programme. Always learning from these programmes.
Cheers, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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figgis
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Lovely thing, that bird feeder :thumbsup:

Paul, as a matter of interest, what's the ratio of your time spent bottle digging compared to detecting?
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Kenleyboy
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figgis wrote: Fri Aug 28, 2020 4:43 pm Lovely thing, that bird feeder :thumbsup:

Paul, as a matter of interest, what's the ratio of your time spent bottle digging compared to detecting?
I would say at the moment the bottle digging gets more attention and the only reason for this is due to the land I have permission on is under crop , just coming off now . When my metal detecting season begins I usually alternate in equal measures between both hobbies .
It may change due to this new tip which is very close to home so my journey time is considerably less allowing me more time and we are also on a bit of a deadline as it will soon fill with water and become impossible to dig until it dries out again . We also have five more potential tips to have a go on but its down to time . Once I get my detecting head on my focus changes and I give the bottle digging a miss .
The big tip we usually go on is deep digging and very hard so it will be nice to have a break from there plus the farm tip is only available to me for a short period . Must admit I am very keen to get out on the fields again digging smaller holes :thumbsup:
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figgis
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Thanks for that, Paul :thumbsup: Sounds like your time is full, one way or the other. Good thing to diversify, as detecting alone is dependent upon so many variables but you seem to have the bases covered :thumbsup:
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Kenleyboy
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figgis wrote: Fri Aug 28, 2020 7:06 pm Thanks for that, Paul :thumbsup: Sounds like your time is full, one way or the other. Good thing to diversify, as detecting alone is dependent upon so many variables but you seem to have the bases covered :thumbsup:
I try and make an effort to get out for a few hours once a week when possible , goes in fits and starts . :thumbsup:
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