Flint for Oxgirl

Post Reply
User avatar
DaveP
Posts: 1781
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:40 pm
Location: Spread in England
Has thanked: 664 times
Been thanked: 1949 times

Remember this one I posted the other day. Dating flints relies a lot on context. Flint tools cover a very wide span of time and the technology doesn’t really change. Keep in mind they are tools to do a job. Arrow heads will break or be lost so why go to a lot of effort to produce something of the quality you would see in a museum. It’s going to last possibly once when stuck in a deer or bouncing off a tree. And, they are quick to produce. In skilled hands many tools take a matter of minutes to make and, I suppose, could be considered disposable.
Flint tools don’t follow a linear pattern of getting better and more refined – some do, but not always. As metal technology appears some of the flints become less well worked and just functional.
Based on the associated contextual information we can date this one quite accurately. The flint material is of low quality (not like the highly prized flint from Norfolk - Grimes Graves) and almost certainly made from a weathered flint typical of southern England. Although it could have been made almost anywhere, we know it is associated with a group moving through the Weald and South parts of the Thames basin on a regular basis.
The date period overlaps heavily with new metal technology which probably accounts for the basic form although it may also reflect the skill of the maker. The associated context dates it to the early 3rd millennium. It’s the first one from this area but I’m hoping a few better examples will turn up.
IMG_1568.jpg
Pete E
Posts: 2812
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2020 10:05 pm
Location: North Wales
Has thanked: 3695 times
Been thanked: 2423 times

So Dave, what actually is it? And is it whole or has part of the base broken off?
User avatar
DaveP
Posts: 1781
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:40 pm
Location: Spread in England
Has thanked: 664 times
Been thanked: 1949 times

Pete E wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 6:39 pm So Dave, what actually is it? And is it whole or has part of the base broken off?
Clue is in the last paragraph ;)
User avatar
Oxgirl
Posts: 13412
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2020 4:21 pm
Location: Oxfordshire
Has thanked: 10070 times
Been thanked: 11692 times

Roman arrow head?
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
User avatar
DaveP
Posts: 1781
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:40 pm
Location: Spread in England
Has thanked: 664 times
Been thanked: 1949 times

Oxgirl wrote: Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:07 pmRoman arrow head?
Now come on OG, millennium, not century. It was made early in the third millennium - in fact, some time Friday afternoon :lol:

It was a first attempt at a flint tool to understand the process a little more. I've got a long way to go to match today's arrowhead but it's surprising how quickly you can produce things that work as blades or scrapers or, in this case, a pointy thing that will have your eye out!

Sorry folks, I couldn't resist the tease - Dave made me do it ;)

Chris
Post Reply