Always double check information!

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Saffron
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Just a quick reminder to say "Always double check information!", especially if its on the internet!!

I have just sent out two e-mails about errors I have seen this evening, both on sites that normally would be considered "very trustworthy" :thumbdown:

Anybody see an obvious error in this statement -
The definite Roman road of Watling Street, which links Viroconium (Wroxeter) to Isca Silurum (Caerleon)

I would expect most on here to say "Watling Street does not link Wroxeter to Caerleon. It runs from Dover through London to Wroxeter"

That error was on a counties archaeological service site that is maintained by the County Council, and the specific page gave an indepth breakdown of the counties Roman roads. Related pages on the same site include the counties HER records :x :pulling hair out: :pulling hair out: :pulling hair out:

For good measure I am far from convinced that the section of Roman road that I am interested in is related to the Wroxeter to Caerleon road as that is a North / South route, and the road I am looking at is part of a very long section (at least 20 miles) of road that runs directly East / West :!:

You might well have seen my spindle whorl post. While doing further research I came across a site extensively used by detectorist that has a diagram of a spindle whorl and how it works with the whorl (the lead weight) at the TOP :shock: :pulling hair out:
Trust me that would never work. The worl is ALWAYS at the bottom of the spindle.

Evan
Pete E
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Hi Evan,

I too was under the belief that spindle whorls were always on the bottom, but how do you account for the wear groove that appears on the side of so many we find?

That indicates the fibres are constantly passing and wearing the sides of the whorl, and I can't see that happening if it's located on the bottom of the spindle???

Regards

Peter
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DaveP
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Hi Peter,

the groove is there for the start of the process to hold the wool in place and have an anchor for the spinning part.. It's not caused by continual rubbing of the fibres across the whorl.

Evan,
depending on the design and process you can have top or bottom whorls for spinning wool, though I'm with you on the lead ones being at the bottom for ease of attachment - but it isn't a given.

Picture attached is just to show wool over the whorl (top whorl) and the same is used for whorls at the bottom.

And if you are really curious this lady seems to have researched it well. Her last comment is interesting ".....running it top weighted"

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Pete E
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DaveP wrote: Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:33 am Hi Peter,

the groove is there for the start of the process to hold the wool in place and have an anchor for the spinning part.. It's not caused by continual rubbing of the fibres across the whorl.
:angel: Thanks, that makes more sense now especially with at video...
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Saffron
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DaveP wrote: Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:33 am
Evan,
depending on the design and process you can have top or bottom whorls for spinning wool, though I'm with you on the lead ones being at the bottom for ease of attachment - but it isn't a given.

Picture attached is just to show wool over the whorl (top whorl) and the same is used for whorls at the bottom.

And if you are really curious this lady seems to have researched it well. Her last comment is interesting ".....running it top weighted"

Dave,
very many thanks for that.

Its certainly different to my understanding, and different to ALL the examples I have seen previously, mainly at medieval re-enactments. But it did seem to work! (although to me it looked less "stable" when top weighted).

It will be interesting to see what response I get if any.

Evan
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DaveP
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Evan,

I too had always assumed the weight was at the bottom. I can't believe I've just looked in to some published work on spinning and whorls but it seems it's not so straightforward. Different weights and different whorl positions are used for different thickness of thread and different fibre types. Fine threads and fine fibres (different wool breeds, cotton) spun in to fine threads appear to be done on top whorl spindles whereas the thicker threads and coarser fibres are made on bottom whorl spindles. But, you can also have middle whorls and also change the weight during the spinning process. It also varies a little depending on which part of the world and date - and, the technology will change over time as people move across the far East, Africa and Europe. Then add the different shapes of the distaff (wooden bit) and it seems all things are possible.

I think my head is spinning.

Chris
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