Neolithic polished votive axe.

Fisher 1266 X
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Hell Fire Jan!
That is an increible find and may probably be your find-of-a-lifetime-find!
A stunner indeed.
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Ladybird66
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Oh wow Jan, great find. Something else we’ve got in common :thumbsup:

I can remember exactly how I felt when I spotted the one I found. Absolute disbelief but also absolute certainty as to what I was looking at. The feeling when I picked it up and thought how old it was and that I was the first person to touch it in several thousand years and then the wonderment of how it had been made.

I think, regardless of other nice finds you’ve had it will always be your favourite.

Very well saved :clapping: :clapping:

p.s. it looks like polished granite. (Got a nice piece in the garden)
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alloverover
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Very nice that is Jan :thumbsup: I remember when I found one, I saw it and carried on detecting up and down, passed it several times thinking " I know what that is" but not picking it up, dont know why, I guess it was just sinking into my brain what was going on :Thinking:

Beautiful find and well deserved I reckon :thumbsup:
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Paint
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Great find jan :clapping: :clapping: that must go down as your oldest find :thumbsup: And one you will always remember :Party:
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Easylife
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Awesome, a lovely find, well done. :thumbsup:
D2 - 13"x11" coil - audio only.
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Littleboot
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Thanks all for the kind comments. I just love this little guy. It was a bit of a miracle I spotted it as the ground is so dusty and fluffy. I went back sans detector in order to field walk the area but spotted no more stone tools this time. I did find some pottery which is different from the usual medieval ware and post-medieval redware. More crude and more inclusions in the clay body.. I intend to do some more walking in that field after there has been some rain.
It isn't flint. It is dolerite and most likely came from a quarry in Northern Brittany.
The site is a dolerite quarry which was the exploited in the Neolithic period, from 3500BC to 1800BC,[1] for the production of polished stone tools.[2]

This production is estimated at 5,000 axes per year, various other tools besides axes were produced and widely exported beyond the limits of Armorica. Quelfennec's axes have been found throughout western France (from Normandy to Languedoc), but also in North-West Europe, the British Isles, and Belgium,[1] These polished stone axes were used to carry out deforestation to allow for the expansion of agriculture. It is the particular hardness of dolerite, without excessive brittleness, which explains its particular interest in making axes and adzes (hatchets with curved edges like the muzzle of an ermine) but also strikers.[3]

By around 2000BC the site gradually went out of use with the introduction of metal tools....

I also found a picture of how the axe blade would be set ...which surprised me a tad as I had visualised something else.


I do love finding something I haven't found before and learning new things.
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DaveP
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Jan, Thanks for the follow--up and information. Really interesting and it's such a lovely find. There is a suggestion that antler material was also used as sleeves for the axe where it went in to the wooden handle to act as a shock absorber and be less likely to split. There's also a reference that says in skilled hands an axe takes about 20-30 minutes to make and then small ones about 5 hours to polish. The big ones may take 40 hours to polish :shock:
Littleboot wrote: Mon Sep 14, 2020 1:41 pm I did find some pottery which is different from the usual medieval ware and post-medieval redware. More crude and more inclusions in the clay body.
Whoa - it gets more interesting. That needs identifying and then, if you know your landowner well, it's time for a sondage or two. You may have found a dwelling area or even a grave. If you need any help just shout ;) :thumbsup:
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Ladybird66
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Aren’t some of the stones at Stone Henge Dolerite ? That’s really interesting Jan. it’s a lovely thing and not damaged. That is amazing in itself.
Great pic of how it would have been ‘mounted’. I had a different picture in mind as well. It looks like a useful tool in the proper setting. :thumbsup:
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Cantiaci
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Blimey now THATS a wonderful thing! :clapping:
Congratulations.. what a find!
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Blackadder43
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Fantastic research Jan, and you can see on your 3rd photo just how your research is spot on as you can see the wear where it was socketed
If we had a find of the month, i think that would top the charts :thumbsup:
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