A herd of Gryphaea and a white belemnite...

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HolzHammer
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Morning All,
I find a fair few "devils toenails" ( rarely whole ones) in Herts and belemnites (again, fragments usually) but here is something bit different from both species!

I'm not sure gryphaea came in herds but there are certainly a few together here... I've tried to wheedle some more detail as the orange surrounding "rock" is quite soft but i risked damaging the fossils so I stopped. And I have never had a "white" belemnite and was only recently mulling over the fact that they all seemed to come in that very smooth brown stone or whatever it is which form the cavity the living organisms left behind.

Nice additions to the collection!
All the B
Alexander
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figgis
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Cor, I'm liking that albino belemnite bigtime :thumbsup:

There are a fair few belemnites in the gravel in my garden and I've noticed they're translucent. Would love to cut and polish a few.

There are also loads of gryphaea in it, presently residing in a builders' bucket until I decide what to do with them.
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DaveP
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HolzHammer wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 11:05 am And I have never had a "white" belemnite and was only recently mulling over the fact that they all seemed to come in that very smooth brown stone or whatever it is which form the cavity the living organisms left behind.
Just for info the bit we all find is the rostrum which gives rise to the name for belemnites. Apparently it's from the Greek belemnon meaning dart or arrow. Behind that and partly inside the rostrum sits the phragmocone which aids buoyancy and the leads to the proostractum - a little like the quill inside a squid and you sometimes find these inside the rostrum or even separately (picture below ref: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-81-322-3658-0_3- always site a reference for copyright)
The rostrum is made of calcite which can vary quite a bit in colour. I have seen it said that the colour relates to the geological period although others say it's due to oxygen and temperature levels.

Just a bit of Sunday info.
Belemnite.jpg
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tesorobri
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nice finds loads of toe nails where I go near scarbro and a few belemnites but never seen a white one
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Oxgirl
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Superb fossils. I’m fascinated by fossils and enjoy being on fields where they are present. Yours are lovely :thumbsup:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Ladybird66
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Great, interesting find. Nice to find a collection like that. I think the ‘rock’ they’re stuck in was once soft sand that has also fossilised. I’ve never found a devils toe nail but hope I will one day.

When we moved here to Wales, 21 years ago, our bungalow sat in the middle of a patch of field with sheep netting for a fence and no cultivated garden.
After a great deal of pondering and thinking I decided what I wanted to do with it. One section was quite steep so I thought a rockery might be the answer. Looked around for some big rocks and was surprised how much they were asking for them. I had noticed a local farm had some at the side of the field. Being cheeky I went and asked if he would sell me a few.
Well not only wouldn’t he have anything for them, he even delivered them for me. One in particular caught my interest, it’s full of fossilised sea shells. As far as I can see, nothing out of the ordinary and all broken but interesting.
What I find amazing is that the White cliffs of Dover are entirely made up of shells. Now they are white :thumbsup:
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Littleboot
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I think it's great you didn't separate the cluster of toe-nails, Alex. They are much more interesting in situ! We get the same fossil combos here in Calvados.....in the cliffs at the cost which corresponds geologically with the Dorset coast. The Belemnites are such lovely tactile things. The white one is lovely.

Val, once more we appear to be long lost sisters. I have also asked our farmer for the stones he drags up with the plough and dumps at the edge of his fields. I learned how to dry-stone wall from my dad as we lived in a limestone area in the UK. So I did a curved wall for the space where the hot-tub goes, created a rockery around it, used an old stone lintel to make a bench, etc etc. i found two stones in the mix which I believe have been worked long ago. One with a dog-tooth pattern and one with the vestiges of a face. They came from a field near a deserted village.
i just love stones, fossils etc...I even collect feathers when I am out and about.
Live long and prosper.
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HolzHammer
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DaveP wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 5:13 pm Just for info the bit we all find is the rostrum which gives rise to the name for belemnites. Apparently it's from the Greek belemnon meaning dart or arrow. Behind that and partly inside the rostrum sits the phragmocone which aids buoyancy and the leads to the proostractum - a little like the quill inside a squid and you sometimes find these inside the rostrum or even separately (picture below ref: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-81-322-3658-0_3- always site a reference for copyright)
The rostrum is made of calcite which can vary quite a bit in colour. I have seen it said that the colour relates to the geological period although others say it's due to oxygen and temperature levels.

Just a bit of Sunday info.

Belemnite.jpg

Thanks Dave, very interesting!
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HolzHammer
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Ladybird66 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:34 am Great, interesting find. Nice to find a collection like that. I think the ‘rock’ they’re stuck in was once soft sand that has also fossilised. I’ve never found a devils toe nail but hope I will one day.

When we moved here to Wales, 21 years ago, our bungalow sat in the middle of a patch of field with sheep netting for a fence and no cultivated garden.
After a great deal of pondering and thinking I decided what I wanted to do with it. One section was quite steep so I thought a rockery might be the answer. Looked around for some big rocks and was surprised how much they were asking for them. I had noticed a local farm had some at the side of the field. Being cheeky I went and asked if he would sell me a few.
Well not only wouldn’t he have anything for them, he even delivered them for me. One in particular caught my interest, it’s full of fossilised sea shells. As far as I can see, nothing out of the ordinary and all broken but interesting.
What I find amazing is that the White cliffs of Dover are entirely made up of shells. Now they are white :thumbsup:
For various reasons i spend quite a bit of time in N.Wales - in fact I'm off tomorrow - I quite often find large rock in the middle of pasture just like the ones you describe... I'm always rather amazed as they seem a bitout of context but presumably the area was underwater at some point!
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HolzHammer
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Littleboot wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 1:03 pm I think it's great you didn't separate the cluster of toe-nails, Alex. They are much more interesting in situ! We get the same fossil combos here in Calvados.....in the cliffs at the cost which corresponds geologically with the Dorset coast. The Belemnites are such lovely tactile things. The white one is lovely.

Val, once more we appear to be long lost sisters. I have also asked our farmer for the stones he drags up with the plough and dumps at the edge of his fields. I learned how to dry-stone wall from my dad as we lived in a limestone area in the UK. So I did a curved wall for the space where the hot-tub goes, created a rockery around it, used an old stone lintel to make a bench, etc etc. i found two stones in the mix which I believe have been worked long ago. One with a dog-tooth pattern and one with the vestiges of a face. They came from a field near a deserted village.
i just love stones, fossils etc...I even collect feathers when I am out and about.
i always collect interesting feathers esp. from the falcons etc.... the metal we find is only the half of it!
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HolzHammer
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Oxgirl wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 8:51 pm Superb fossils. I’m fascinated by fossils and enjoy being on fields where they are present. Yours are lovely :thumbsup:
Thanks Cath, I was scuttling around looking for fossils in fields long before i started with the detector so my eye is quite tuned for finding the obvious ones! I love finding them it can make an unproductive day's detecting more enjoyable!
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