Getting permissions

Legendkiller45
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Does anyone have great difficulty in getting permissions? Have tried numerous farms in the area and just get no or we have a detectorist already. I initially write letters to them using a template from a book called 'Permission Impossible'. Leave my details and then follow up with a visit to the farm or a phone call. Not been terribly successful. Does anyone have any tips or ways round this as I'm worried I will leave the hobby due to lack of areas to detect. Thank you.
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Oxgirl
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Welcome to the forum :D

Getting permissions is never easy and lots of people, even established ones struggle to secure permissions. It’s often best to ask around your friends or family first as it’s often surprising how many know someone who knows someone else who has land. Start small - someone with a big garden or who has a small plot of land rather than farmers.

You could try your local Facebook group too as that can occasionally work. You don’t say where you live but the beaches are another option. Not ideal I know but perseverance does pay off.

Good luck, I hope you find somewhere :thumbsup:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Ladybird66
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I think this is a particularly bad time to be asking for permissions. It’s never been easy and seems to be getting harder with each year that passes.
There has been the expensive option of organised digs but even those have been hit badly this year.
Asking around, friends & family, local veggie shops, farmers shops, even stables. Any might have small areas they would let you detect. I s’pose the pub might have been useful but not so much now. You’d be surprised how many peeps know someone who’s got somewhere.
As for proper, big farms, all you can do is keep pecking away at them. Sooner or later someone will give you the go ahead. The other option is to volunteer some working hours to get a foot in the door.
Us ‘oldies’ always advise a possible newbie to get somewhere to use a machine before you buy one. If you don’t its like having a top of the range car and not knowing how drive.
If you say where you are (roughly) there’s a chance someone will ask you to join them.
Best of luck :thumbsup:
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Ladybird66
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Oxgirl wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:44 am Welcome to the forum :D

Getting permissions is never easy and lots of people, even established ones struggle to secure permissions. It’s often best to ask around your friends or family first as it’s often surprising how many know someone who knows someone else who has land. Start small - someone with a big garden or who has a small plot of land rather than farmers.

You could try your local Facebook group too as that can occasionally work. You don’t say where you live but the beaches are another option. Not ideal I know but perseverance does pay off.

Good luck, I hope you find somewhere :thumbsup:
Amazing :shock: did you write that or was it me doing it twice :lol:
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Littleboot
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The main points have been covered by the ladies above ...but I will add a few more:

It is a good idea to offer your services locally to people who have lost rings, keys, want to locate cables, manholes etc. A card in the local shops offering the free service is a way of getting brownie points and get you on land.

Remember to talk to people. It is harder of course with this current nonsense but always try to mention your hobby in conversation if you can. It is a subject people find interesting and it can garner 'leads'. Some of the techniques involved in selling are very useful.....especially ways of avoiding 'cold-calling' (which is always the hardest selling situation.) So what you need to always focus on is opportunity to get 'leads'. Introductions, a mutual friend, a name you can drop.
But most of all make sure people know about your detecting thing. My hubby is lamentable at it...he will come home and ramble on about someone he's met and what a nice old house they have, or big garden they have got, or their livestock or whatever....and I will immediately say Did you mention about detecting? Or better still get permission? And of course he hasn't. Missed opportunity (and smack around the head from me) right there.
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
Carling 2

As. The post abundance of hammereds describes, there ain't many places left to detect and let's face it you can ask for permissions till your blue in the face but 95% of the time someone's been there before if you are successful so you'll get excited and full of optimism only to go and find tin and washers that other people leave and the following week it's back to the drawing board,,, sorry just saying as is and as most of us know it.
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Legendkiller45 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:44 am Does anyone have great difficulty in getting permissions? Have tried numerous farms in the area and just get no or we have a detectorist already. I initially write letters to them using a template from a book called 'Permission Impossible'. Leave my details and then follow up with a visit to the farm or a phone call. Not been terribly successful. Does anyone have any tips or ways round this as I'm worried I will leave the hobby due to lack of areas to detect. Thank you.
I think a lot depends on where you live in the country....

I live in North Wales and found it relatively easy to get a number of permissions, none are overly productive, but you don't know that untill you try. I would say don't overlook small paddocks and pony fields ect...Very often just get one leads onto getting others.

That said, now may not be the best time and Covid meant I lost a potentially cracking permission before I even started when the owners family changed his mind....
Carling 2

Carling 2 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:56 am As. The post abundance of hammereds describes, there ain't many places left to detect and let's face it you can ask for permissions till your blue in the face but 95% of the time someone's been there before if you are successful so you'll get excited and full of optimism only to go and find tin and washers that other people leave and the following week it's back to the drawing board,,, sorry just saying as is and as most of us know it.
And before it turns into a witch hunt.. All I'm saying the people that find the most in this hobby are the 1s that generally stick to there old productive permissions, me I been tectin 25 years and only got 4 new permissions during the last 5 years ( they all turned out to be bare) mind you I live in a small village in Herefordshire and there's another 5 detectorist in the village that I know of and I've had 21 hammereds so far this year but I've kept on to the. Several thousands of acres that I basically started with,,, so nope I don't hold much faith in any new permission especially if it's got any historic vibe 😁😁
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Oxgirl
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Ladybird66 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:53 am Amazing :shock: did you write that or was it me doing it twice :lol:
Great minds think alike LB - we are advice twins :Luv Ya:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Littleboot
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Carling 2 wrote: Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:44 am And before it turns into a witch hunt.. All I'm saying the people that find the most in this hobby are the 1s that generally stick to there old productive permissions, me I been tectin 25 years and only got 4 new permissions during the last 5 years ( they all turned out to be bare) mind you I live in a small village in Herefordshire and there's another 5 detectorist in the village that I know of and I've had 21 hammereds so far this year but I've kept on to the. Several thousands of acres that I basically started with,,, so nope I don't hold much faith in any new permission especially if it's got any historic vibe 😁😁
Another solid reason for staying in Normandy for at least a year or so longer: No problem getting undetected land...with history too. I actually regularly get farmers see me around and they stop and ask me if I want to do theirs too!
"The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the axe, for the axe was clever and convinced the trees that because his handle was made of wood he was one of them."
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Oxgirl
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Helps being a woman too Jan :thumbsup: . We seem to be harder to say no to. Obviously it’s our beauty that bowls them over :lol:
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Kenleyboy
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Permission hunting is one of the stumbling blocks in the hobby which many have struggles with and I won't drone on about my experiences as its been done to death . There is hope though and I agree wholeheartedly that you have to try and drop in the conversation that you metal detect .It doesn't always get a response , in my case mostly a glazed expression !
Recently had a customer pop over to discuss an order and have a nosey around my workshop to see whats on the production line and the conversation turns to hobbies . I always like to know what interests the other person has and in this case he has a passion for collecting old metal advertising signs which then led onto bottle digging etc . From there on in I mentioned my other passion being metal detecting which then led onto an invite to metal detect two acres of land he owns :thumbsup: I can't get on it yet because the grass is about three feet tall but once its been cut I can get on and have a go . In cases such as this I would take the above advice in the recent posts and get chatting to people locally , neighbours , farm shops etc and eventually you may get lucky . :thumbsup:
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Ladybird66
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There is one sure way of meeting like minded people. Have you got a dog ?
I walk mine twice a day and generally cross paths with the same people. It’s amazing how the conversations swing from one subject to another and even if who you’re talking to doesn’t own any land themselves the odd one or two will, or at least know someone else who does.
As already said it does make a difference what part of the country you live in, the more rural the better.
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figgis
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We can only speak from our own experience of course, but the view that all land has been taken up is certainly not the case locally to me. Of the five permissions I have, one was previously detected to death, one was detected for a while by people who only looked around the farmhouse and medieval market area but neglected the other fields where all the Roman goodies are ( :D :thumbsup: ) and the other three had never seen a detector on them before mine.

And I'm in Norfolk.
tone
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being in the hobby for many years i've acquired many thousands of acres to detect on so it's been a good few years since i've at to go knocking on door's . but i always found it best to ask face to face just be confident . i'd go out on a sunday pick an area your interested in take your lunch and spend all day just asking land owner's for permission if you get one in ten ask's it's a start . :thumbsup:
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