STONES

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DaveP
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Ladybird66 wrote: Thu Sep 17, 2020 1:45 pm
Ah, now that’s interesting. I’ve heard reference to both Iron Ore and Iron Stone. Being ignorant on the subject I’d assumed they were the same. I imagine Iron Ore would be the one exported for smelting. That’s probably what picked up on the beach. It’s a bit weathered now bu maybe you might recognise it in the pic (just go and snap it)
It’s tremendously heavy, weighing in at 6lbs 5oz
Ironstone has been used for iron but it's not economical. As it was used it would have been considered an 'ore' but isn't now. The iron ores with a higher magnetite (magnetic) or haematite content are used as a source of iron. Put "iron ore Pembrokeshire" in to Google and you'll find a whole history of iron mining on the coast and plenty of places where you can see the outcrops.
As a rule of thumb if a stone feels heavier than it looks it is probably a metal ore. I suspect you have a chunk of ore.

The other iron coloured lump or nodule to look out for on the beach are pyrite or marcasite nodules. They are dark brown and either have a smooth-ish surface or distinct small crystal pattern. They range from hazel nut to cricket ball size. The bigger ones look lovely when broken but they don't last and will oxidise and eventually fall apart. I would add a picture but I can't find one around the house - probably all gone to school with my wife.
Update - just found an old picture I used for another site - they are all pyrite or marcasite nodules from the beach. Be warned - they get heavy!


Chris.
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Ladybird66
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DaveP wrote: Thu Sep 17, 2020 4:42 pm Ironstone has been used for iron but it's not economical. As it was used it would have been considered an 'ore' but isn't now. The iron ores with a higher magnetite (magnetic) or haematite content are used as a source of iron. Put "iron ore Pembrokeshire" in to Google and you'll find a whole history of iron mining on the coast and plenty of places where you can see the outcrops.
As a rule of thumb if a stone feels heavier than it looks it is probably a metal ore. I suspect you have a chunk of ore.

The other iron coloured lump or nodule to look out for on the beach are pyrite or marcasite nodules. They are dark brown and either have a smooth-ish surface or distinct small crystal pattern. They range from hazel nut to cricket ball size. The bigger ones look lovely when broken but they don't last and will oxidise and eventually fall apart. I would add a picture but I can't find one around the house - probably all gone to school with my wife.
Update - just found an old picture I used for another site - they are all pyrite or marcasite nodules from the beach. Be warned - they get heavy!


Chris.
Thanks for the info Chris. Know nothing about a lot of things but recognise something different to the norm. Has to be carried or dragged home for further investigation. One way of learning I s’pose :thumbsup:
Found something else on doggie tea time walk, might post it, just for interest.
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