SNAKES 😳

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shaggybfc
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I’ve seen a few snakes when detecting, not all of them reptilian.
Never seen an adder but plenty of grass snakes.
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Mucky
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Fisher 1266 X wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:20 pm I was lucky to film the "Dance of the Adders" which is quite rare to see. Oddly enough, I saw it twice that day at different locations.

Here's a link to that video: https://youtu.be/V6rzRSterSI

As you'll see, they ended up scrapping on my boot! :shock: :o :D
Fascinating video there and you were very lucky to see it! I'm pretty certain they were mating. :thumbsup:
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Ladybird66 wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:32 am I thought it might be a subject of interest as I’ve seen a couple when out detecting. This one is indeed a grass snake but the first I’ve seen with white eye patches. The others have been yellow and I don’t think there were black spots along their bodies.
On closer examination I could see puncture marks on its body and given where it was lying I think it may have been picked up by a Buzzard and then dropped with its head just off the grass verge on the lane. It had then been run over leaving its head intact but flat.
I found a huge female on the horses muck pile years ago. John said she’d probably laid her eggs there for the heat from the manure. At the other extreme I found a baby in the garden. It was like a shoe lace but perfect. And yes, I too spotted an Adder in the wet part of the field, just once and never since. Hope not to again :
Just goes to show how much wild life there is around us but also how we need to be aware and careful.
I wonder if the snakes in your muck heap were actually slowworms?

I haven't seen a snake in years; the last time was in Northumberland when I almost sat on an Adder!

Besides grass snakes, smooth snakes and Adders, Wales also has two known colonies of a non native snake whose name escapes me but it's a type of rat snake from main land Europe. One colony is in and around the grounds of the Welsh Mountain Zoo in Colwyn Bay and the other colony was discovered near Bridgend.....
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figgis
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Pete E wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 12:30 am I wonder if the snakes in your muck heap were actually slowworms?
Grass snakes love muck heaps and lay their eggs in them, using the heat for incubation. If you've a muck heap and a pond you have a grass snake Ritz, such as one of our clients has. It's lovely to see the newly-hatched snakelets which are, as Val said, like bootlaces but perfectly formed.
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Kenleyboy
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Seen quite a few grass snakes , most of which have been whilst fishing , they do like to swim across lakes and ponds . Many years ago while visiting Wicken Fen nature reserve visitors were warned about the possibility of seeing Adders resting up on the dry grass borders of the tracks around the reserve and not to touch them ! Sound advice . We did see a number off them curled up and enjoying the sunshine . That was the first time I had seen an Adder and have never seen any since , quite a rare snake .
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figgis wrote: Sun Sep 20, 2020 6:01 am
Grass snakes love muck heaps and lay their eggs in them, using the heat for incubation. If you've a muck heap and a pond you have a grass snake Ritz, such as one of our clients has. It's lovely to see the newly-hatched snakelets which are, as Val said, like bootlaces but perfectly formed.
Yes, I think the same applies to slow worms, which are a type of "legless" lizard for those who haven't come across them....

I remember as a child my dad would always turn over/disturb any piles of leaves/garden waste he was going to burn in case anything had taken up residence in them and it's a habit I still follow now....
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Littleboot
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I see a lot of slow worms but usually in spring and they are very hard to confuse with grass snakes not least because they are so small in comparison. they also have a lizard-y head and are not (apart from the absence of legs, natch :lol: ) snake-like at all.
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Ladybird66
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No way of confusing them. Well I don’t think so anyway. 2 things about slow worms, they hardy have any eyes, very tiny compared to the grass snake and adder and the other thing, have you every tried to catch a slow worm ? Like greased lightening :shock:
The only one I’ve ever managed to catch was trying to warm up in a shaft of Sunshine on a cold winter day. I was surprised to see it and thought it might be dead. Picked it up and it moved, so I held for a minuet or two till it was wriggling then put it in the grass.
Fascinating little things :thumbsup:
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