Lead medallion find, what is it? Answer has been found

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Dave77
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Found yesterday, looks old. Does anyone recognise the design?
Cross with a skull and cross bones. There is writing on it but it is very hard to read.
The back is plain with no writing or design. Lead.
Any information would be great.
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IMG_3976.jpg
Thanks,
Dave
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Oxgirl
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No idea but I think it’s an amazing find 8-)
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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HolzHammer
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Oxgirl wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 11:14 am No idea but I think it’s an amazing find 8-)
yes, very unusual I'd have thought...
Pete E
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Dave77 wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 9:54 am Found yesterday, looks old. Does anyone recognise the design?
Cross with a skull and cross bones. There is writing on it but it is very hard to read.
The back is plain with no writing or design. Lead.
Any information would be great.
No idea of what it is, or how old, but a stunning find and one that can easily cause the imagination to run riot..

Can you give some context where it was found? Any churches near by? Does the locality have any history associated with the Plague?
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Dave77
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Pete E wrote: Sun Sep 13, 2020 12:53 pm No idea of what it is, or how old, but a stunning find and one that can easily cause the imagination to run riot..

Can you give some context where it was found? Any churches near by? Does the locality have any history associated with the Plague?
It was found in an area of lots of ancient history, the field is approx 2 miles from the village.
History
This is one of the largest mottes in Northern Ireland. These earth and timber forts were built following the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ulster in 1177, when John de Courcy conquered large parts of counties Down and Antrim. This would have been a centre of local Norman rule.

Dundonald refers to a 12th-century Norman fort, or Dún, Dún Dónaill, that stood in the town. One of the largest in Ireland, the man-made hill that the fort stood on is still in existence.
Although the mound is commonly referred to as 'the moat' this is, in fact, a corruption of the word 'motte' and refers to the fact that this defensive structure was built in the style of a motte and bailey.St. Elizabeth's Church is located beside the moat, with the Cleland Mausoleum in the adjacent graveyard.
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Dave
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Dave The Slave
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Will be interested to see how the ID turns out.
Trying to look at the legend, not sure if i can see " HON " on the 2nd photo.
Different type of find, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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Paint
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That’s a cracking find and very unusual but could tell a story if it could talk :thumbsup:
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DaveP
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I'll take a punt and say it represents Golgotha with the cross on a raised mound and the skull and crossbones of Adam either side

or

not a pendant but pinned to some other form of tomb or urn as a memento mori.


They should teach detecting in schools - such a great way of delving in to history. Every day would be a school day.
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Dave77
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I can`t find my original post so;
I received this email yesterday, thank you everyone who has helped so far.

I have had a look at the Christian symbolism on the one good face of your token and would
agree with the time frame you suggest in that the token probable does date from the 17th century
( 1600 - 1699 ).

The symbols of mortality ( skull and crossed bones ) were commonly used by
Scottish token makers, particularly in connection with the Christian Cross as a reminder to the
owner that life is uncertain and death inevitable, so one is well advised to get their soul sorted
before time will run out.

I assume that the token was manufactured in base metal and clearly at one time had a latin
motto around the central group of figures. To my mind this is suggestive of a Scottish religious
token, possible a souvenir from a visit to a religious site ( Skye or similar ) and may have belonged
to a Galloglass ( Scottish Mercenary soldier ) who came over from Scotland to fight with one side
or the other in North Down, during that extremely bloody period in our history.

Its a pity that the wording in the reverse is so far gone as to be illedgible, as this would most
likely told us the location where this token originated. In the meantime, all I can suggest is
that you forward your photographs over to The National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh,
who can advise if they have seen anything similar originating from the West Coast of Scotland,
home of "The Lord of the Isles " and most likely home of our Galloglass.

Robert Bashford.
Secretary of The Irish Lodge of Masonic Research.
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Dave
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Ladybird66
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That’s what you call a result. Great find. Thanks for posting the out-come. :thumbsup:
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figgis
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Great result, and thanks for sharing the info :thumbsup:

(I've merged your update thread with the original so everything's in one place :thumbsup: )
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Great bit of research Dave and a very interesting result...

Can I ask what lead you to contacting the Masons on this? Did you think the token was possibly masonic?

Regards

Peter
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Oxgirl
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Brilliant result and great to get an update :D
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Dave77
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Pete E wrote: Thu Oct 01, 2020 11:17 am Great bit of research Dave and a very interesting result...

Can I ask what lead you to contacting the Masons on this? Did you think the token was possibly masonic?

Regards

Peter
Hi Peter,
A local Facebook group suggested a possible Masonic link but reading Robert`s email I think it is Scottish, so I have
emailed the National Museum of Scotland to see if I can learn anything else. Very exciting.
Thanks,
Dave
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Pete E
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Thanks Dave...I only asked because it's not a resource I would have ever thought of...

Although it might not be strictly Masonic, I think there was a certain amount of "commonality" with the symbolism back then..It will be interesting to hear what the Scottish Museum say....
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