An easy bottle dig

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Kenleyboy
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I haven't been out much on the bottle front lately but there was one little tip I wanted to go check out which is very local and had ignored it for some time . We have a list of potential tips to go check out and some are very promising while others tend to be a little too late but still worth a look . This fresh tip is a bit late in age for my liking but it is always better to have a test dig and check them out as some of the late tips are tipped on top of earlier stuff . By late tips we are talking 1930s and 40s era and despite this they can have some earlier throw outs and you can be surprised what you can find in amongst the more modern bottles .
My digging buddy is out of action for a few weeks so it was a lone wander about and it had been bugging me for a while and as it was close to home it worth having a probe about even for a few hours .
The tip is in a small wooded area just off from an old disused railway line , quite a pleasant autumnal walk through the tunnel of high hedges and trees where the old single rail line route snaked along in times past and I do wonder if the old carriages were loaded up with rubbish and this stop off point was where the trash was unloaded . Imagine doing just that same thing nowadays , people of course still fly tip but get caught and it is hefty fines popping through your letter box . The wood is a pleasant one , small and sheltered with adjoining farm land beyond the hedges , a peaceful enough view yet here the ground was strewn with thousands of bottles .
late tip.jpg
The photo shows just a small section of the woodland tip after having a scrape about with the rake . It is absolutely loaded with bottles with most just under the surface of damp leaf mould and pressing the prongs of the fork into the soil you can feel the hollow twang as metal hits glass and at times it is hard to get the fork right in , its rammed with bottles .
The thing with some of these out of the way tips , they go largely unnoticed , just lay dormant for years and every now and again kids or adults will come along and take a few bottles or even have a short dig . There was signs of previous digging , nothing too strenuous looking but you could see the fresh colour in the turned over soil , fragments of glass and bottles protruding through the muck , sun bleached glass , dull and pasty looking from being exposed to the sunlight for a few years where the the internal soil had turned chalky white , these were old holes or more like scrapes in the ground and I could see no sign of any recent digging .
The down side is of course the age and to be truthful if this was Victorian then I am in no doubt this one would have been dug out many years ago but all the same , they are definitely worth having a trial dig just to get an idea of what may lay beneath the upper more modern layers .
There were signs of stoneware , bits of ginger beer bottles which is a very good sign and even some printed jars but these were fragments dotted randomly here and there .
I had an hour or so to have a quick dig and even thought it had now began to rain , I have to say under the cover of the trees , they at least afforded some shelter but the shower was refreshing while I got myself warmed up welding my spade . The amount of bottles were incredible and it even made the digging quite hard but the depth needed up being about two feet deep then that was it , no more bottles just flint and chalk .The bottles were mostly screw tops and the amount of poison bottles that were coming out literally one after the other , the usual ribbed pattern glass and the "poisonous not to taken " embossed on the front panel . In amongst this never ending steam of glass there were some cork top bottles so it mostly appeared to be a mix of 1920s to 1940s period so there was some hope .
late tip keepers.jpg
These were what I settled on for coming home , nothing overly great but a couple of poisons with taking for trade offs and the rest will go to some friends of mine . From what I dug up in my short session , there were a ton of bottles and it just kept going and these are what was left behind , a little too late for my liking but well worth some further investigation due to the odd early shards of stoneware so there will be one area which is at the early period that I much prefer and has more appeal .
late tip leave behinds.jpg
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Mucky
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I can only say Thanks again for another good post and wish you luck finding some gems a bit deeper. :thumbsup:
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Easylife
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I think we are all becoming armchair bottle digging experts thanks to you. :thumbsup:
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Dave The Slave
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" Thousands of bottles lying there ".
Sounds like heaven to a mere amateur bottle hunter. 30`s to 50`s are interesting to a non Pro.
Loved them photos Paul.
Great write up as per usual. :thumbsup:
Dave.
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Kenleyboy
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Dave The Slave wrote: Mon Oct 05, 2020 8:48 am " Thousands of bottles lying there ".
Sounds like heaven to a mere amateur bottle hunter. 30`s to 50`s are interesting to a non Pro.
Loved them photos Paul.
Great write up as per usual. :thumbsup:
Dave.
Have to admit when I first started out this would have been a bottle diggers dream for someone just getting into the hobby and although it is a bit late for my tastes , it is one of those don't forget where it all started syndromes . There are some wonderful mint bottles there especially some of the perfume bottles with the classic art deco style shapes to them and with the original plastic lids . A vast array of Stephens inks , they too with the lids and the company embossed on them . One day these bottles will become sought after and as the victorian tips are becoming harder to find then bottle diggers will turn their attention to these later tips because nobody is bothering with them at the moment .
Believe it or not , the early 70s Fairy liquid bottles are now becoming collectible and fetch silly money if in mint condition . They will collect plastic from the 70s but not Art Deco bottles from the 20s .
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