Art Deco bottle dig

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Kenleyboy
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Back out again on the hunt once more for bottles but with a slightly different approach and a completely different era , one that I am not always tuned in with as far as bottle digging . The small shallow late tip was once again my destination and I had been asked a favour from a very good friend so it was a good enough excuse to oblige , at least I will be digging bottles but not for me this time round .
My old mate is decorating one room in his house in the Art Deco style and had asked if I would save any bottles from this period . I have a love hate relationship with this art movement , some of it I do quite like but in general it is not really my thing but some of the clean lines in the design style are quite pleasant and as it was vogue back in the 30s then of course many bottle products were made in the Art Deco style which is quite a quirky thing for that period .
There does appear to be some conflicting dates as to when the Art Deco period began which came in just after my much preferred Art Nouveau period in 1908 and lasted until 1935 . This conflicts with other dates stating that it began in 1925 and finished in 1940 , perhaps this was when it was at its hight of popularity but the date lines whatever they are do fall in with the bottle era on this small tip .
On my last trip a few weeks ago I had noticed how many Art Deco bottles I had dug and most still had their Bakelite lids which was most unusual , most bottles apart from the vast array of Victorian beer bottles are found without their original lids and collectors are always on the lookout for original lids and stoppers .
Most of the bottles are perfume and these do carry the elegant stylised design with Cathedral shapes to the vessels while another is similar in design to a miniature juke box and each manufacturer had to be competitive enough to appeal to the hearts and minds of their Female clientele , hence the elegant and delicate styles incorporated to sell their wares . The bottles vary in shape and size but all have a certain appeal and although not quite my area of bottle interest I can appreciate some of the styles used .

The weather was kind today which set me in good stead for my short journey and the walk along the disused Railway track was a pleasant one as I made my way along the streamlined path now littered with the fallen leaves marking the onset of Autumn . A couple of weeks makes a huge difference , the days are now becoming shorter and the temperature will drop as the afternoon closes its doors on another day . There is still plenty leaf on the trees but they are beginning to wilt and fading to a more paler shade and soon they will be gone and this little tip will be even more exposed than it already is and then I shall leave this one for another more pleasant season . Truth be known it is a little late for my tastes , I have little interest in any bottles after the Edwardian period but it does have some potential to throw up a possible late throw out and one promising piece I did dig up was just the neck and lip part of a very early stoneware porter from about 1880 , despite it lacking its bottom half I just wonder what an earth an early bottle is doing in such a late tip but it is often known that later tips can and do throw up some very early glass and stoneware bottles so they are always worth investigating . I liken this approach to a supposedly done to death field , walk over it and one day you just may dig up a little gem .

This little lot are some of the many finds dug out of this very shallow tip , the bottles are literally a few inches under the soil and a foot or so down then that is your overall depth , so not hard digging but a little mind numbing after a few hours of continual digging up and exposing yet more sauce bottles and umpteen jars . Some of the jars are huge and in some ways they are a shame to leave behind , they would make excellent storage vessels for all manner of things , it seems such a waste . when I can I generally take home the ivory shade stoneware jam jars , these are ideal for pens and brushes etc and have that nice rustic look about them , go down to your trendy Nik oak store and you will see similar or the same selling for stupid money because they have that "shabby Chic " look about them , they cost me nothing , just my time .
art deco dug bottles.jpg
The dig as always begins with the enthusiastic prod of the fork into the soil and to be met with the telltale sound of the glass twanging away beneath , and levering up the clumps of earth has bottles and jars and bits of broken crockery spilling out from there resting place into an untidy but pleasant heap of yesteryears rubbish . A gloved hand picks through the spoil but with this tip it will disappoint more than be uplifting , that only comes when you are focussed on what you are after and soon the first take home Art Deco bottle complete with its clean bakelite lid gets placed to one side . In this case it did not disappoint , there were plenty coming up the furhter the fork investigated the matted roots and soil there in amongst the muck was the alien glint of shiny glass remarkable that such a fragile material has survived so long underground in all weathers . There are times when bottles will fill with water , the winter freezes the contents which expands and the glass can't take the pressure any longer and they crack , it happens but here there is no real evidence of this occurring , the galls comes out in top condition , bright and clean as the day it was made . Soon the excitement seems to fade a little as the monotony and my back can't take any more and a couple of hours later it really is time to pack up . make good and head for home .
The spoils for a friend .
art deco bottles all cleaned .jpg
Two conflicting design styles , both appeal to me and are my favourites out of all of them .
art deco pair .jpg
The lid on this little bottle is quite nice , a faux tortoiseshell design , different to all the other black bakelite lids and the name AMAMI reads "Love Me " in Italian , always nice to be able to do a little research .
amami lid.jpg
Finally , I couldn't resist bringing this little poison Lysol bottle home , lovely amber glass in minty condition , this will go in the bulk box and when the numbers grow they will be sold to a contact , a bit of pocket money which is a nice bonus , a bit like collecting a bucket full of lead bits of the field and cashing them in .
art deco dig lysol bottle.jpg
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Oxgirl
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It’s funny how we all like certain time periods and not others. I knew someone who was mad about art deco and bought an early 20th century house and spent a fortune buying the right furniture and lights. It was nice, but did nothing for me. Those bottles are sweet but I think the earlier glass is much nicer. I love the robustness of Victorian glass and the rare and thin beauty of the earlier stuff.

I too am liking that Lysol bottle though. Very sweet indeed. Isn’t this time of year the best for digging? Cooler, less flies and no real nettle growth yet.
Yes I really don’t like Roman coins, I’m not joking
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Littleboot
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Wow...this is a bit different! The scent bottle is lush! 8-) Oo I love a bit of Deco...we had a 30's house and I got really into it. Here in France there are lots of antiques from the period available at flea markets and car boots....much more so in the UK because the French are too mean to throw anything away. :lol: I still watch Jeeves and Wooster and old pre-war movies....I just sold a 1920's reversible kimono opera-jacket (Japanese made for the deco market in europe) for £300 on my online shop and I bought it in the early 80's for a tenner. Different periods keep coming in and out of fashion in a cycle.
Victorian stuff isn't really my thing...with the exception of the Arts and Crafts movement at the end of the period. I love the furniture of that period particularly.
I have found quite a few Deco bottles here at our house when i have been digging new borders for the garden. Little bottles for hair oil mainly I suspect, and ones with measures on the side for various quackery.

As usual a first class write up and photo's of your day....especially so when one considers how tired you must be in the midst of it all. Do you often cut yourself?
Live long and prosper.
Blackadder43
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Another great history lesson through the media of dumped bottles :thumbsup:

I am still amazed at the amount of whole specimens that turn up in this hobby......
I dont think i could leave any behind though, deep rooted nature to save everything :lol:

Cheers for the write up fella.......Really looking forward to your book when you write it :thumbsup: (You should do one if you can find the time)
"The history of life through the bottle"
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Kenleyboy
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Oxgirl wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:37 am It’s funny how we all like certain time periods and not others. I knew someone who was mad about art deco and bought an early 20th century house and spent a fortune buying the right furniture and lights. It was nice, but did nothing for me. Those bottles are sweet but I think the earlier glass is much nicer. I love the robustness of Victorian glass and the rare and thin beauty of the earlier stuff.

I too am liking that Lysol bottle though. Very sweet indeed. Isn’t this time of year the best for digging? Cooler, less flies and no real nettle growth yet.
This time of year and throughout winter are good times for digging . As you say , no nettles or flies and midges plus despite the cold and frost , digging warms you up :thumbsup:
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Kenleyboy
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Littleboot wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 10:51 am Wow...this is a bit different! The scent bottle is lush! 8-) Oo I love a bit of Deco...we had a 30's house and I got really into it. Here in France there are lots of antiques from the period available at flea markets and car boots....much more so in the UK because the French are too mean to throw anything away. :lol: I still watch Jeeves and Wooster and old pre-war movies....I just sold a 1920's reversible kimono opera-jacket (Japanese made for the deco market in europe) for £300 on my online shop and I bought it in the early 80's for a tenner. Different periods keep coming in and out of fashion in a cycle.
Victorian stuff isn't really my thing...with the exception of the Arts and Crafts movement at the end of the period. I love the furniture of that period particularly.
I have found quite a few Deco bottles here at our house when i have been digging new borders for the garden. Little bottles for hair oil mainly I suspect, and ones with measures on the side for various quackery.

As usual a first class write up and photo's of your day....especially so when one considers how tired you must be in the midst of it all. Do you often cut yourself?
I have been very lucky as far as avoiding any bad cuts and I always wear gloves . I had one very close shave when a shard of glass poking out of the side wall sliced through a very heavy duty glove and opened up the material with ease . If that had been a finger then it would be a trip to A and E !
Dave The Slave
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Great write up and photos, Paul.
Found one of those Amami wave set bottles , earlier in the year, probably belonged to one of the WAAFs from the local airbase.
Also like the Lysol bottle.
Thanks for posting, :thumbsup:
Dave.
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figgis
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Blackadder43 wrote: Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:18 am Really looking forward to your book when you write it :thumbsup: (You should do one if you can find the time)
"The history of life through the bottle"
I think there might be one other who's more qualified to merit that particular title :lol:

I've always been more drawn to Nouveau than Deco, but as time's gone by the gap has narrowed and now I can appreciate both :thumbsup:
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